United States
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C.  20549
FORM 10-K

[X]ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE
SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2007
OR
[  ]TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE
SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from _________ to _________
 
Commission file number 1-11986
   
TANGER FACTORY OUTLET CENTERS, INC.
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)
   
North Carolina
56-1815473
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
   
3200 Northline Avenue, Suite 360
(336) 292-3010
Greensboro, NC 27408
(Registrant’s telephone number)
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
   
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
   
Title of each class
Name of exchange on which registered
Common Shares, $.01 par value
New York Stock Exchange
7.5% Class C Cumulative Preferred Shares,
New York Stock Exchange
Liquidation Preference $25 per share
 
   
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:  None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
Yes ý   No  o

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.
Yes o  No ý

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ý   No o

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of Registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer: and “smaller reporting company” (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934).   ý Large accelerated filer  o Accelerated filer o Non-accelerated filer o Smaller reporting company

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Act).   Yes o  No ý

The aggregate market value of voting shares held by non-affiliates of the Registrant was approximately $1,174,206,000 based on the closing price on the New York Stock Exchange for such stock on February 1, 2008.

The number of Common Shares of the Registrant outstanding as of February 1, 2008 was 31,339,241.

Documents Incorporated By Reference
Part III incorporates certain information by reference from the Registrant’s definitive proxy statement to be filed with respect to the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held May 16, 2008.

 
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PART I

Item 1.   Business

The Company

Tanger Factory Outlet Centers, Inc. and subsidiaries is one of the largest owners and operators of factory outlet centers in the United States.  We are a fully-integrated, self-administered and self-managed real estate investment trust, or REIT, which focuses exclusively on developing, acquiring, owning, operating and managing factory outlet shopping centers.  As of December 31, 2007, we owned 29 outlet centers, with a total gross leasable area, or GLA, of approximately 8.4 million square feet.   These factory outlet centers were 98% occupied and contained over 1,800 stores, representing approximately 370 store brands.  Also, we owned a 50% interest in two outlet centers with a GLA of approximately 667,000 square feet.

Our factory outlet centers and other assets are held by, and all of our operations are conducted by, Tanger Properties Limited Partnership and subsidiaries.  Accordingly, the descriptions of our business, employees and properties are also descriptions of the business, employees and properties of the Operating Partnership.  Unless the context indicates otherwise, the term “Company” refers to Tanger Factory Outlet Centers, Inc. and subsidiaries and the term “Operating Partnership” refers to Tanger Properties Limited Partnership and subsidiaries.  The terms “we”, “our” and “us” refer to the Company or the Company and the Operating Partnership together, as the text requires.

We own the majority of the units of partnership interest issued by the Operating Partnership, through our two wholly-owned subsidiaries, the Tanger GP Trust and the Tanger LP Trust.  The Tanger GP Trust controls the Operating Partnership as its sole general partner.  The Tanger LP Trust holds a limited partnership interest.  The Tanger family, through its ownership of the Tanger Family Limited Partnership, or TFLP, holds the remaining units as a limited partner.  Stanley K. Tanger, our Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, is the sole general partner of TFLP.

As of December 31, 2007, our wholly-owned subsidiaries owned 15,664,621 units and TFLP owned the remaining 3,033,305 units.  Each TFLP unit is exchangeable for two of our common shares, subject to certain limitations to preserve our status as a REIT.  As of February 1, 2008, our management beneficially owned approximately 19% of all outstanding common shares (assuming TFLP’s units are exchanged for common shares but without giving effect to the exercise of any outstanding share and partnership unit options or the conversion of the exchangeable notes).

Ownership of our common shares is restricted to preserve our status as a REIT for federal income tax purposes.  Subject to certain exceptions, a person may not actually or constructively own more than 4% of our common shares or 9.8% of our 7.5% Class C Cumulative Preferred Shares, or Class C Preferred Shares.  We also operate in a manner intended to enable us to preserve our status as a REIT, including, among other things, making distributions with respect to our outstanding common shares equal to at least 90% of our taxable income each year.

We are a North Carolina corporation that was formed in March 1993.  Our executive offices are currently located at 3200 Northline Avenue, Suite 360, Greensboro, North Carolina, 27408 and our telephone number is (336) 292-3010.  Our website can be accessed at www.tangeroutlet.com.  A copy of our 10-K’s, 10-Q’s, and 8-K’s can be obtained, free of charge, on our website.


 
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Recent Developments

On Going Development Projects: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and Deer Park (Long Island), New York

We continue the development, construction and leasing of two previously announced sites located in Washington County, south of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and in Deer Park (Long Island), New York.  In response to strong tenant demand for space, we increased the size of the initial phase of the Pittsburgh center from 308,000 square feet to 370,000 square feet, with signed leases for approximately 63% of the first phase and an additional 20% under negotiation or out for signature.  We currently expect delivery of the initial phase in the second quarter of 2008, with stores opening by the end of the third quarter of 2008.  Upon completion of the project, the outlet center will total approximately 418,000 square feet.  The Pittsburgh project is wholly owned by us. Tax incentive financing bonds have been issued related to the Pittsburgh project, and we expect to receive net proceeds of approximately $16.8 million as we incur qualifying expenditures during construction of the center.  As of December 31, 2007 we have received funding for qualified expenditures submitted totaling $7.6 million.

The Deer Park project is owned through a joint venture in which we own a 33.3% interest.  The joint venture currently expects the Deer Park center will contain over 800,000 square feet upon final build-out.  Site work and construction continues on an initial phase of approximately 682,000 square feet.  Deer Park has signed leases for approximately 51% of the initial phase and an additional 22% under negotiation or out for signature.  The joint venture currently expects the project will be delivered in the second quarter of 2008, with stores opening by the end of the third quarter of 2008.

Potential Future Developments

We currently have an option for a new development site located in Mebane, North Carolina on the highly traveled Interstate 40/85 corridor, which sees over 83,000 cars daily.  The site is located halfway between the Research Triangle Park area of Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill, and the Triad area of Greensboro, High Point and Winston-Salem.  The center is currently expected to be approximately 300,000 square feet.  During the option period, we will be analyzing the viability of the site and determining whether to proceed with the development of a center at this location.

We have also started the initial pre-development and leasing for a site we have under control in Port St. Lucie, Florida at Exit 118 on Interstate I-95.  Approximately 64,000 cars utilize this exit each day.  Port St. Lucie is one of Florida’s fastest growing cities and is located less than 40 miles north of Palm Beach, Florida and one exit south of the New York Mets’ spring training facility.  This center is expected to be approximately 350,000 square feet and initial reaction to the site from our magnet tenants has been very positive.

At this time, we are in the initial study period on these potential new locations.  As such, there can be no assurance that any of these sites will ultimately be developed.  During the third quarter of 2007 we put on hold our plans to develop a center in Burlington, New Jersey due to numerous development and site access issues.

2007 Expansion Projects

During 2007, we completed expansions in three of our outlet centers.

 
Expansion
New Total
Center
GLA
Center GLA
Gonzales, Louisiana
39,000
282,000
Branson, Missouri
25,000
303,000
Tilton, New Hampshire
18,000
246,000
Total expansions
82,000
 

A fourth expansion project, in Barstow, California, is near completion.  Some stores opened during the fourth quarter of 2007 and the remaining stores will open during the first two quarters of 2008.  The total expansion in Barstow of 62,000 square feet will bring the center’s total GLA to 171,300 square feet.


 
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Increase in and extension of unsecured credit facilities

During the fourth quarter of 2007, we extended the maturity dates on five of our six unsecured lines of credit from 2009 to June 2011.  During the first quarter of 2008, we increased the maximum availability under our existing unsecured credit facilities by $125.0 million, bringing our total availability to $325.0 million.  The terms of the increases are identical to those included within the existing unsecured credit facilities with the borrowing rate ranging from LIBOR plus 75 basis points to LIBOR plus 85 basis points.

On February 15, 2008, our $100 million, 9.125% unsecured senior notes matured.  We repaid these notes in the short term with amounts available under our unsecured lines of credit.  On July 10, 2008, our only remaining mortgage loan with a principal balance of $172.7 million and bearing interest at a coupon rate of 6.59% will become payable at our option.  Because the mortgage was assumed as part of an acquisition of a portfolio of outlet centers, the debt was recorded at its fair value and carries an effective interest rate of 5.18%.  On the optional payment date, we can decide to repay the loan in full, or we can continue to make monthly payments on the loan at a revised interest rate of 8.59%.  We can then repay the loan in full on any monthly payment date without penalty.  The final maturity date on the loan is July 10, 2028.  We are currently analyzing our various options with respect to refinancing this mortgage.

The Factory Outlet Concept

Factory outlets are manufacturer-operated retail stores that sell primarily first quality, branded products at significant discounts from regular retail prices charged by department stores and specialty stores. Factory outlet centers offer numerous advantages to both consumers and manufacturers.  Manufacturers selling in factory outlet stores are often able to charge customers lower prices for brand name and designer products by eliminating the third party retailer.  Factory outlet centers also typically have lower operating costs than other retailing formats, which enhance the manufacturer’s profit potential.  Factory outlet centers enable manufacturers to optimize the size of production runs while continuing to maintain control of their distribution channels.  In addition, factory outlet centers benefit manufacturers by permitting them to sell out-of-season, overstocked or discontinued merchandise without alienating department stores or hampering the manufacturer’s brand name, as is often the case when merchandise is distributed via discount chains.

We believe that factory outlet centers continue to present attractive opportunities for capital investment, particularly with respect to strategic new developments, re-merchandising plans and expansions of existing centers.  We believe that under present conditions such development or expansion costs, coupled with current market lease rates, permit attractive investment returns. We further believe, based upon our contacts with present and prospective tenants, that many companies, including prospective new entrants into the factory outlet business, desire to open a number of new factory outlet stores in the next several years, particularly in markets where there are successful factory outlet centers in which such companies do not have a significant presence or where there are few factory outlet centers.


 
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Our Factory Outlet Centers

Each of our factory outlet centers carries the Tanger brand name.  We believe that national manufacturers and consumers recognize the Tanger brand as one that provides factory outlet shopping centers where consumers can trust the brand, quality and price of the merchandise they purchase directly from the manufacturers.

As one of the original participants in this industry, we have developed long-standing relationships with many national and regional manufacturers.  Because of our established relationships with many manufacturers, we believe we are well positioned to capitalize on industry growth.

Our factory outlet centers range in size from 24,619 to 729,315 square feet and are typically located at least 10 miles from major department stores and manufacturer-owned, full-price retail stores.  Manufacturers prefer these locations so that they do not compete directly with their major customers and their own stores. Many of our factory outlet centers are located near tourist destinations to attract tourists who consider shopping to be a recreational activity.  Our centers are typically situated in close proximity to interstate highways that provide accessibility and visibility to potential customers.

As of February 1, 2008, we had a diverse tenant base comprised of approximately 370 different well-known, upscale, national designer or brand name concepts, such as Liz Claiborne, GAP, Banana Republic, Old Navy, Polo Ralph Lauren, Reebok, Tommy Hilfiger, Nautica, Abercrombie & Fitch, Hollister, Eddie Bauer, Coach Leatherware, Brooks Brothers, Nike and others.  Most of the factory outlet stores are directly operated by the respective manufacturer.

No single tenant (including affiliates) accounted for 10% or more of combined base and percentage rental revenues during 2007, 2006 and 2005.  As of February 1, 2008, our largest tenant, including all of its store concepts, accounted for approximately 8.0% of our GLA.  Because our typical tenant is a large, national manufacturer, we have not experienced any significant problems with respect to rent collections or lease defaults.

Revenues from fixed rents and operating expense reimbursements accounted for approximately 90% of our total revenues in 2007.  Revenues from contingent sources, such as percentage rents, vending income and miscellaneous income, accounted for approximately 10% of 2007 revenues.  As a result, only small portions of our revenues are dependent on contingent revenue sources.

Business History

Stanley K. Tanger, the Company’s founder, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, entered the factory outlet center business in 1981.  Prior to founding our company, Stanley K. Tanger and his son, Steven B. Tanger, our President and Chief Operating Officer, built and managed a successful family owned apparel manufacturing business, Tanger/Creighton Inc., or Tanger/Creighton, which business included the operation of five factory outlet stores.  Based on their knowledge of the apparel and retail industries, as well as their experience operating Tanger/Creighton’s factory outlet stores, they recognized that there would be a demand for factory outlet centers where a number of manufacturers could operate in a single location and attract a large number of shoppers.

In 1981, Stanley K. Tanger began developing successful factory outlet centers.  Steven B. Tanger joined the Company in 1986 and by June 1993, the Tangers had developed 17 centers with a total GLA of approximately 1.5 million square feet. In June 1993, we completed our initial public offering, making Tanger Factory Outlet Centers, Inc. the first publicly traded outlet center company.  Since our initial public offering, we have grown our portfolio through the strategic development, expansion and acquisition of outlet centers and are now one of the largest owner operators of factory outlet centers in the country.

Business Strategy

Our company has been built on a firm foundation of strong and enduring business relationships.  We partner with many of the world’s best known and most respected retailers and manufacturers.  By fostering and maintaining strong tenant relationships with these successful, high volume companies, we have been able to solidify our position as a leader in the outlet industry for more than a quarter century.  The confidence and trust that we have developed with our retail partners from the very beginning has allowed us to forge the impressive retail alliances that we enjoy today with approximately 370 brand name manufacturers.

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Nothing takes the place of experience.  We have had a solid track record of success in the outlet industry for the past 27 years.  In 1993, Tanger led the way by becoming the industry’s first outlet center company to be publicly traded.  Our seasoned team of real estate professionals utilizes the knowledge and experience that we have gained to give us a competitive advantage and a history of accomplishments in the manufacturers’ outlet business.

We are proud to report that as of December 31, 2007, our wholly owned outlet centers were 98% occupied with average tenant sales of $342 per square foot.  Our properties have had an average occupancy rate of 95% or greater on December 31st of each year since 1981. The ability to achieve this level of performance is a testament to our long-standing relationships, industry experience and our expertise in the development and operation of manufacturers' outlet centers.

Growth Strategy

Growth doesn’t happen by chance.  We build shareholder value with a comprehensive plan for sustained growth.  We focus our efforts on increasing rents in our existing centers, renovation and expansion of our mature centers and reaching new markets through the ground-up development or acquisition of new outlet centers.

Increasing Rents at Existing Centers

Our leasing team implements an ongoing strategy designed to positively impact our bottom line.  This is accomplished through the aggressive marketing of available space to maintain our standard for high occupancy levels.  Leases are negotiated to provide for inflation-based contractual rent increases or periodic fixed contractual rent increases and percentage rents.  Due to the overall high performance of our shopping centers, we are typically able to renew leases at higher base rents per square-foot and attract stronger, more popular brands to replace under performing tenants.

Developing New Centers and Expanding Existing Centers

We believe that there continues to be significant opportunities to introduce the Tanger brand in untapped or under-served markets across the United States of America.  As we search the country looking for new markets, we do our homework and determine site viability on a timely and cost-effective basis.  Our 27 years of outlet industry experience, extensive development expertise and strong retail relationships give us a distinct competitive advantage.  Our company’s access to capital facilitates our ability to react quickly when opportunities arise.  Keeping our shopping centers across the nation vibrant and growing is a key part of our formula for success.  In order to maintain our reputation as the premiere outlet shopping destination in the markets that we serve, we have an ongoing program of renovations and expansions taking place at our outlet centers coast to coast.  We expect that the development of new centers and the expansion of existing centers will continue to be a substantial part of our future growth strategy.

We follow a general set of guidelines when evaluating opportunities for the development or acquisition of new centers.  This typically includes seeking locations within markets that have at least 1 million people residing within a 30 to 40 mile radius with an average household income of at least $65,000 per year, frontage on a major interstate or roadway that has excellent visibility and a traffic count of at least 55,000 cars per day.  Leading tourist, vacation and resort markets that receive at least 5 million visitors annually are also on our development radar and are closely evaluated.  Although our current goal is to target sites that are large enough to support centers with approximately 75 stores totaling at least 300,000 square feet, we maintain the flexibility to vary our minimum requirements based on the unique characteristics of a site and our prospects for future growth and success.

In order to help ensure the viability of proceeding with a project, we gauge the interest of our retail partners first.  We generally require that at least 50% of the space in each center is pre-leased prior to acquiring the site and beginning construction.  Construction of a new factory outlet center has normally taken us nine to twelve months from groundbreaking to the opening of the first tenant stores.  Construction for expansion and renovation to existing properties typically takes less time, usually between six to nine months depending on the scope of the project.

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Acquiring Centers

As a means of creating a presence in key markets and to create shareholder value, we may selectively choose to acquire individual properties or portfolios of properties that meet our strategic investment criteria.  We believe that our extensive experience in the outlet center business, access to capital markets, familiarity with real estate markets and our management experience will allow us to evaluate and execute our acquisition strategy successfully. Through our tenant relationships, our leasing professionals have the ability to implement a remerchandising strategy when needed to increase occupancy rates and value.  We believe that our managerial skills, marketing expertise and overall outlet industry experience will also allow us to add long-term value and viability to these centers.

Operating Strategy

Increasing cash flow to enhance the value of our properties and operations remains a primary business objective. Through targeted marketing and operational efficiencies we strive to continue improving sales and profitability for our tenants and our shopping centers as a whole.  Commanding higher base and percentage rents and generating additional income from temporary leasing, vending and other sources also remains an important focus.

Leasing

The long-standing retailer relationships that we enjoy allow us the ability to provide our shoppers with a collection of the world’s most popular outlet stores. Tanger customers shop and save on their favorite brand name merchandise including men's, women's and children's ready-to-wear, lifestyle apparel, footwear, jewelry & accessories, tableware, housewares, luggage and domestic goods.  In order that our centers can perform at a high level, our leasing professionals continually monitor and evaluate tenant mix, store size, store location and sales performance.  They also work to assist our tenants through re-sizing and re-location of retail space within each of our centers for maximum sales of each retail unit across our portfolio.

Marketing

Our marketing plans deliver compelling, well-crafted messages or enticing promotions and events to targeted audiences for tangible, meaningful and measurable results.  Our plans are based on a basic measure of success – increase sales and traffic for our retail partners and we will create successful centers.  Utilizing a strategic mix of print, radio, television, direct mail, website, internet advertising and public relations, we consistently reinforce the message that “Tanger is the place to shop for the best brands and the biggest outlet savings - direct from the manufacturer”.  Our marketing efforts are also designed to build loyalty with current Tanger shoppers and create awareness with potential customers.  The majority of consumer-marketing expenses incurred by us are reimbursable by our tenants.

Capital Strategy

We achieve a strong and flexible financial position by: (1) managing our leverage position relative to our portfolio when pursuing new development and expansion opportunities, (2) extending and sequencing debt maturities, (3) managing our interest rate risk through a proper mix of fixed and variable rate debt, (4) managing our liquidity by maintaining and using our lines of credit in a conservative manner and (5) preserving internally generated sources of capital by strategically divesting our underperforming assets and maintaining a conservative distribution payout ratio.


 
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We intend to retain the ability to raise additional capital, including public debt or equity, to pursue attractive investment opportunities that may arise and to otherwise act in a manner that we believe to be in our shareholders' best interests.  At the 2007 Annual Shareholders’ Meeting, we increased our authorized common shares from 50.0 million to 150.0 million and added four additional classes of preferred shares with an authorized number of four million shares each.  During the third quarter of 2006, we updated our shelf registration as a well known seasoned issuer where we will be able to register unspecified amounts of different classes of securities on Form S-3.  To generate capital to reinvest into other attractive investment opportunities, we may also consider the use of additional operational and developmental joint ventures, the sale or lease of outparcels on our existing properties and the sale of certain properties that do not meet our long-term investment criteria.

During the fourth quarter of 2007, we extended the maturity dates on five of our six unsecured lines of credit from 2009 to June 2011.  During the first quarter of 2008, we increased the maximum availability under our existing unsecured credit facilities by $125.0 million, bringing our total availability to $325.0 million.  The terms of the increases are identical to those included within the existing unsecured credit facilities with the borrowing rate ranging from LIBOR plus 75 basis points to LIBOR plus 85 basis points.

On February 15, 2008, our $100 million, 9.125% unsecured senior notes matured.  We repaid these notes in the short term with amounts available under our unsecured lines of credit.  On July 10, 2008, our only remaining mortgage loan with a principal balance of $172.7 million and bearing interest at a coupon rate of 6.59% will become payable at our option.  Because the mortgage was assumed as part of an acquisition of a portfolio of outlet centers, the debt was recorded at its fair value and carries an effective interest rate of 5.18%.  On the optional payment date, we can decide to repay the loan in full, or we can continue to make monthly payments on the loan at a revised interest rate of 8.59%.  We can then repay the loan in full on any monthly payment date without penalty.  The final maturity date on the loan is July 10, 2028.  We are currently analyzing our various options with respect to refinancing this mortgage.  Based on cash provided by operations, existing credit facilities, ongoing negotiations with certain financial institutions and our ability to sell debt or equity subject to market conditions, we believe that we have access to the necessary financing to fund the planned capital expenditures during 2008.

Competition

We carefully consider the degree of existing and planned competition in a proposed area before deciding to develop, acquire or expand a new center.  Our centers compete for customers primarily with factory outlet centers built and operated by different developers, traditional shopping malls and full- and off-price retailers.  However, we believe that the majority of our customers visit factory outlet centers because they are intent on buying name-brand products at discounted prices.  Traditional full- and off-price retailers are often unable to provide such a variety of name-brand products at attractive prices.

Tenants of factory outlet centers typically avoid direct competition with major retailers and their own specialty stores, and, therefore, generally insist that the outlet centers be located not less than 10 miles from the nearest major department store or the tenants’ own specialty stores.  For this reason, our centers compete only to a very limited extent with traditional malls in or near metropolitan areas.

We compete with two large national owners of factory outlet centers and numerous small owners.  During the last several years, the factory outlet industry has been consolidating with smaller, less capitalized operators struggling to compete with, or being acquired by, larger, national factory outlet operators.  Since 2000 the number of factory outlet centers in the United States has decreased while the average size factory outlet center has increased.  During this period of consolidation, the high barriers to entry in the factory outlet industry, including the need for extensive relationships with premier brand name manufacturers, have minimized the number of new factory outlet centers. This consolidation trend and the high barriers to entry, along with our national presence, access to capital and extensive tenant relationships, have allowed us to grow our business and improve our market position.


 
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Corporate and Regional Headquarters

We rent space in an office building in Greensboro, North Carolina in which our corporate headquarters are located.  In addition, we rent a regional office in New York City, New York under a lease agreement and sublease agreement, respectively, to better service our principal fashion-related tenants, many of whom are based in and around that area.

We maintain offices and employ on-site managers at 29 centers. The managers closely monitor the operation, marketing and local relationships at each of their centers.

Insurance

We believe that as a whole our properties are covered by adequate comprehensive liability, fire, flood, earthquake and extended loss insurance provided by reputable companies with commercially reasonable and customary deductibles and limits.  Northline Indemnity, LLC, or Northline, a wholly owned captive insurance subsidiary of the Operating Partnership, is responsible for losses up to certain levels for property damage (including wind damage from hurricanes) prior to third-party insurance coverage.  Specified types and amounts of insurance are required to be carried by each tenant under their lease agreement with us.  There are however, types of losses, like those resulting from wars or nuclear radiation, which may either be uninsurable or not economically insurable in some or all of our locations.  An uninsured loss could result in a loss to us of both our capital investment and anticipated profits from the affected property.

Employees

As of February 1, 2008, we had 203 full-time employees, located at our corporate headquarters in North Carolina, our regional office in New York and our 29 business offices.  At that date, we also employed 226 part-time employees at various locations.

Item 1A.                      Risk Factors

Risks Related to our Business

We face competition for the acquisition of factory outlet centers, and we may not be able to complete acquisitions that we have identified.

One component of our business strategy is expansion through acquisitions, and we may not be successful in completing acquisitions that are consistent with our strategy. We compete with institutional pension funds, private equity investors, other REITs, small owners of factory outlet centers, specialty stores and others who are engaged in the acquisition, development or ownership of factory outlet centers and stores. These competitors may affect the supply/demand dynamics and, accordingly, increase the price we must pay for factory outlet centers we seek to acquire.  These competitors may succeed in acquiring those factory outlet centers themselves. Also, our potential acquisition targets may find our competitors to be more attractive acquirers because they may have greater marketing and financial resources, may be willing to pay more, or may have a more compatible operating philosophy. In addition, the number of entities competing for factory outlet centers may increase in the future, which would increase demand for these factory outlet centers and the prices we must pay to acquire them. If we pay higher prices for factory outlet centers, our profitability may be reduced. Also, once we have identified potential acquisitions, such acquisitions are subject to the successful completion of due diligence, the negotiation of definitive agreements and the satisfaction of customary closing conditions.  We cannot assure you that we will be able to reach acceptable terms with the sellers or that these conditions will be satisfied.

The economic performance and the market value of our factory outlet centers are dependent on risks associated with real property investments.

Real property investments are subject to varying degrees of risk. The economic performance and values of real estate may be affected by many factors, including changes in the national, regional and local economic climate, inflation, unemployment rates, consumer confidence, local conditions such as an oversupply of space or a reduction in demand for real estate in the area, the attractiveness of the properties to tenants, competition from other available space, our ability to provide adequate maintenance and insurance and increased operating costs.

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Real property investments are relatively illiquid.

Our factory outlet centers represent a substantial portion of our total consolidated assets.  These assets are relatively illiquid.  As a result, our ability to sell one or more of our factory outlet centers in response to any changes in economic or other conditions is limited.  If we want to sell a factory outlet center, there can be no assurance that we will be able to dispose of it in the desired time period or that the sales price will exceed the cost of our investment.

Our earnings and therefore our profitability is entirely dependent on rental income from real property.

Substantially all of our income is derived from rental income from real property. Our income and funds for distribution would be adversely affected if a significant number of our tenants were unable to meet their obligations to us or if we were unable to lease a significant amount of space in our centers on economically favorable lease terms. In addition, the terms of factory outlet store tenant leases traditionally have been significantly shorter than in other retail segments. There can be no assurance that any tenant whose lease expires in the future will renew such lease or that we will be able to re-lease space on economically favorable terms.

We are substantially dependent on the results of operations of our retailers.

Our operations are necessarily subject to the results of operations of our retail tenants. A portion of our rental revenues are derived from percentage rents that directly depend on the sales volume of certain tenants. Accordingly, declines in these tenants' results of operations would reduce the income produced by our properties. If the sales of our retail tenants decline sufficiently, such tenants may be unable to pay their existing rents as such rents would represent a higher percentage of their sales. Any resulting leasing delays, failures to make payments or tenant bankruptcies could result in the termination of such tenants' leases.

A number of companies in the retail industry, including some of our tenants, have declared bankruptcy or have voluntarily closed certain of their stores in recent years. The bankruptcy of a major tenant or number of tenants may result in the closing of certain affected stores, and we may not be able to re-lease the resulting vacant space for some time or for equal or greater rent. Such bankruptcy could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and could result in a lower level of funds for distribution.

We may be subject to environmental regulation.

Under various federal, state and local laws, ordinances and regulations, we may be considered an owner or operator of real property and may be responsible for paying for the disposal or treatment of hazardous or toxic substances released on or in our property or disposed of by us, as well as certain other potential costs which could relate to hazardous or toxic substances (including governmental fines and injuries to persons and property). This liability may be imposed whether or not we knew about, or were responsible for, the presence of hazardous or toxic substances.

We are required by law to make distributions to our shareholders.

To obtain the favorable tax treatment associated with our qualification as a REIT, generally, we are required to distribute to our common and preferred shareholders at least 90.0% of our net taxable income (excluding capital gains) each year. We depend upon distributions or other payments from our Operating Partnership to make distributions to our common and preferred shareholders.

Our failure to qualify as a REIT could subject our earnings to corporate level taxation.

We believe that we have operated and intend to operate in a manner that permits us to qualify as a REIT under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. However, we cannot assure you that we have qualified or will remain qualified as a REIT. If in any taxable year we were to fail to qualify as a REIT and certain statutory relief provisions were not applicable, we would not be allowed a deduction for distributions to shareholders in computing taxable income and would be subject to U.S. federal income tax (including any applicable alternative minimum tax) on our taxable income at regular corporate rates. Our failure to qualify for taxation as a REIT would have an adverse effect on the market price and marketability of our securities.

 
10

 

We depend on distributions from our Operating Partnership to meet our financial obligations, including dividends.

Our operations are conducted by our Operating Partnership, and our only significant asset is our interest in our Operating Partnership.  As a result, we depend upon distributions or other payments from our Operating Partnership in order to meet our financial obligations, including our obligations under any guarantees or to pay dividends or liquidation payments to our common and preferred shareholders.  As a result, these obligations are effectively subordinated to existing and future liabilities of the Operating Partnership.  Our Operating Partnership is a party to loan agreements with various bank lenders that require our Operating Partnership to comply with various financial and other covenants before it may make distributions to us.  Although our Operating Partnership presently is in compliance with these covenants, we cannot assure you that it will continue to be in compliance and that it will be able to make distributions to us.

We are subject to the risks associated with debt financing.

We are subject to the risks associated with debt financing, including the risk that the cash provided by our operating activities will be insufficient to meet required payments of principal and interest.  Further, there is the risk that we will not be able to repay or refinance existing indebtedness or that the terms of any refinancing will not be as favorable as the terms of existing indebtedness. If we are unable to refinance our indebtedness on acceptable terms, we might be forced to dispose of properties on disadvantageous terms, which might result in losses.

We may be unable to develop new factory outlet centers or expand existing factory outlet centers successfully.

We continue to develop new factory outlet centers and expand factory outlet centers as opportunities arise. However, there are significant risks associated with our development activities in addition to those generally associated with the ownership and operation of established retail properties. While we have policies in place designed to limit the risks associated with development, these policies do not mitigate all development risks associated with a project. These risks include the following:

•      significant expenditure of money and time on projects that may be delayed or never be completed;

•      higher than projected construction costs;

•      shortage of construction materials and supplies;

failure to obtain zoning, occupancy or other governmental approvals or to the extent required, tenant approvals; and

late completion because of construction delays, delays in the receipt of zoning, occupancy and other approvals or other factors outside of our control.

Any or all of these factors may impede our development strategy and adversely affect our overall business.

An uninsured loss or a loss that exceeds the insurance policies on our factory outlet centers could subject us to lost capital or revenue on those centers.

Some of the risks to which our factory outlet centers are subject, including risks of war and earthquakes, hurricanes and other natural disasters, are not insurable or may not be insurable in the future. Should a loss occur that is uninsured or in an amount exceeding the combined aggregate limits for the insurance policies noted above or in the event of a loss that is subject to a substantial deductible under an insurance policy, we could lose all or part of our capital invested in and anticipated revenue from one or more of our factory outlet centers, which could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition, as well as our ability to make distributions to our shareholders.


 
11

 

Under the terms and conditions of our leases, tenants generally are required to indemnify and hold us harmless from liabilities resulting from injury to persons and contamination of air, water, land or property, on or off the premises, due to activities conducted in the leased space, except for claims arising from negligence or intentional misconduct by us or our agents. Additionally, tenants generally are required, at the tenant's expense, to obtain and keep in full force during the term of the lease, liability and property damage insurance policies issued by companies acceptable to us. These policies include liability coverage for bodily injury and property damage arising out of the ownership, use, occupancy or maintenance of the leased space. All of these policies may involve substantial deductibles and certain exclusions.

Historically high fuel prices may impact consumer travel and spending habits.

Our markets are currently experiencing historically high fuel prices. Most shoppers use private automobile transportation to travel to our factory outlet centers and many of our centers are not easily accessible by public transportation. Increasing fuel costs may reduce the number of trips to our centers thus reducing the amount spent at our centers. Many of our factory outlet center locations near tourist destinations may experience an even more acute reduction of shoppers if there were a reduction of people opting to drive to vacation destinations. Such reductions in traffic could adversely impact our percentage rents and ability to renew and release space at current rental rates.

Increasing fuel costs may also reduce disposable income and decrease demand for retail products. Such a decrease could adversely affect the results of operations of our retail tenants and adversely impact our percentage rents and ability to renew and release space at current rental rates.

Item 1B.                      Unresolved Staff Comments

There are no unresolved staff comments from the Securities Exchange Commission.

Item 2.                       Properties

As of February 1, 2008, our wholly owned portfolio consisted of 29 outlet centers totaling 8.4 million square feet located in 21 states. We own a 50% interest in each of two outlet centers totaling 667,000 square feet through unconsolidated joint ventures.  Our centers range in size from 24,619 to 729,315 square feet.  The centers are generally located near tourist destinations or along major interstate highways to provide visibility and accessibility to potential customers.

We believe that the centers are well diversified geographically and by tenant and that we are not dependent upon any single property or tenant.  Our Rehoboth Beach, Delaware center is the only property that represented more than 10% of our consolidated total assets as of December 31, 2007. See “Business and Properties - Significant Property”.

We have an ongoing strategy of acquiring centers, developing new centers and expanding existing centers. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations--Liquidity and Capital Resources” for a discussion of the cost of such programs and the sources of financing thereof.

Certain of our centers serve as collateral for mortgage notes payable.  Of the 29 outlet centers in our wholly owned portfolio, we own the land underlying 26 and have ground leases on three. The land on which the Sevierville center is located is subject to long-term ground leases expiring in 2046.  The land parcel on which the original Riverhead center is located, approximately 47 acres, is also subject to a ground lease with an initial term that was automatically renewed for an additional five years in 2004, with renewal at our option for up to six more additional terms of five years each.  Terms on the Riverhead center ground lease are renewed automatically unless we give notice otherwise.  The land parcel on which the Riverhead center expansion is located, containing approximately 43 acres, is owned by us.  The 2.7 acre land parcel on which part of the Rehoboth Beach center is located, is also subject to a ground lease with an initial term expiring in 2044, with renewal at our option for additional terms of twenty years each.


 
12

 

The initial term of our typical tenant lease averages approximately five years.  Generally, leases provide for the payment of fixed monthly rent in advance.  There are often contractual base rent increases during the initial term of the lease. In addition, the rental payments are customarily subject to upward adjustments based upon tenant sales volume.  Most leases provide for payment by the tenant of real estate taxes, insurance, common area maintenance, advertising and promotion expenses incurred by the applicable center.  As a result, the majority of our operating expenses for the centers are borne by the tenants.

The following table summarizes certain information with respect to our wholly owned outlet centers as of February 1, 2008.

 
State
Number of
Centers
GLA
(sq. ft.)
%
of GLA
South Carolina
3
1,171,826
    14
Georgia
3
   826,643
     10
New York
1
   729,315
      9
Texas
2
   620,310
      7
Delaware
1
   568,926
      7
Alabama
1
   557,144
      7
Michigan
2
   436,751
      5
Tennessee
1
   419,038
      5
Missouri
1
   302,992
      4
Utah
1
   300,891
      4
Connecticut
1
   291,051
      4
Louisiana
1
   282,318
      3
Iowa
1
   277,230
      3
Oregon
1
   270,280
      3
Illinois
1
   256,514
      3
Pennsylvania
1
   255,152
      3
New Hampshire
1
   245,563
      3
Florida
1
   198,950
      2
North Carolina
2
   186,413
      2
California
1
   127,800
       1
Maine
2
     84,313
       1
Total
              29
8,409,420
100


 
13

 

The following table summarizes certain information with respect to our existing outlet centers in which we have an ownership interest as of February 1, 2008.  Except as noted, all properties are fee owned.

 
 
Location
 
    GLA
(sq. ft.)
 
 
%
Occupied
Wholly Owned Properties
     
Riverhead, New York (1)
729,315
 
97
Rehoboth, Delaware (1)
568,926
 
98
557,144
 
97
San Marcos, Texas
442,510
 
99
Myrtle Beach Hwy 501, South Carolina
426,417
 
93
Sevierville, Tennessee (1)
419,038
 
98
Hilton Head, South Carolina
393,094
 
88
Charleston, South Carolina
352,315
 
92
Commerce II, Georgia
347,025
 
98
Howell, Michigan
324,631
 
95
Branson, Missouri
302,992
 
92
Park City, Utah
300,891
 
98
Locust Grove, Georgia
293,868
 
97
Westbrook, Connecticut
291,051
 
99
Gonzales, Louisiana
282,318
 
95
Williamsburg, Iowa
277,230
 
99
Lincoln City, Oregon
270,280
 
100
Tuscola, Illinois
256,514
 
80
Lancaster, Pennsylvania
255,152
 
96
Tilton, New Hampshire
245,563
 
100
Fort Meyers, Florida
198,950
 
92
Commerce I, Georgia
185,750
 
82
Terrell, Texas
177,800
 
100
Barstow, California
127,800
 
98
West Branch, Michigan
112,120
 
100
Blowing Rock, North Carolina
104,235
 
100
Nags Head, North Carolina
82,178
 
100
Kittery I, Maine
59,694
 
100
Kittery II, Maine
24,619
 
94
 
8,409,420
 
 96
 
Unconsolidated Joint Ventures
     
Myrtle Beach Hwy17, South Carolina (1) (50% owned)
402,013
 
97
Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin (50% owned)
264,929
 
100

(1)  
 These properties or a portion thereof are subject to a ground lease.


 
14

 

The following table summarizes certain information related to GLA as of February 1, 2008 and debt as of December 31, 2007 with respect to our wholly owned outlet centers which serve as collateral for an existing mortgage loan.

 
 
 
 
Lender/Location
 
 
 
GLA
(sq. ft.)
 
 
Mortgage
Debt (000’s)
as of
December 31, 2007
 
 
 
Coupon
Interest Rate
 
 
 
 
Maturity Date
Capmark
       
 
Rehoboth  Beach, DE
568,926
     
 
Foley, AL
557,144
     
 
Myrtle Beach Hwy 501, SC
426,417
     
 
Hilton Head, SC
393,094
     
 
Park City, UT
300,891
     
 
Westbrook, CT
291,051
     
 
Lincoln City, OR
270,280
     
 
Tuscola, IL
256,514
     
 
Tilton, NH
245,563
     
   
$  172,678
6.590% (1)
7/10/2008 (2)
 
Debt premium
1,046
   
Totals
3,309,880
$  173,724
   
(1) Because the Capmark mortgage debt was assumed as part of an acquisition of a portfolio of outlet centers, the debt was recorded at its fair value and carries an effective interest rate of 5.18%.
(2) On July 10, 2008, we can decide to repay the loan in full, or we can continue to make monthly payments on the loan at a revised interest rate of 8.59%.  We can then repay the loan in full on any monthly payment date without penalty.  The final maturity date on the loan is July 10, 2028.

Lease Expirations

The following table sets forth, as of February 1, 2008, scheduled lease expirations for our wholly owned outlet centers, assuming none of the tenants exercise renewal options.

 
 
 
 
 
Year
 
 
 
 
No. of Leases
Expiring     
 
 
 
 
 
Approx. GLA (sq. ft(1))
 
 
 
 
 
Average Annualized Base Rent per sq. ft
 
 
 
 
 
 
Annualized Base Rent (2)
 
% of Gross
Annualized
Base Rent  
Represented
by Expiring
Leases   
2008
168
590,000
 
$ 16.07
 
 $ 9,482,000
7
2009
305
1,346,000
 
  15.39
 
20,714,000
16
2010
310
1,301,000
 
  18.40
 
23,941,000
18
2011
322
1,462,000
 
  15.30
 
22,371,000
17
2012
272
1,303,000
 
  17.24
 
22,465,000
17
2013
157
810,000
 
  16.99
 
13,764,000
11
2014
28
157,000
 
  17.03
 
2,674,000
2
2015
32
144,000
 
  17.88
 
2,574,000
2
2016
35
137,000
 
  19.76
 
2,707,000
2
2017
59
258,000
 
  18.16
 
4,684,000
4
2018 &
thereafter
 
35
 
202,000
 
 
  22.16
 
 
4,477,000
 
4
 
1,723
7,710,000
 
$16.84
 
$129,853,000
100

(1)
Excludes leases that have been entered into but which tenant has not yet taken possession, vacant suites, space under construction, temporary leases and month-to-month leases totaling in the aggregate approximately 699,000 square feet.
(2)
Annualized base rent is defined as the minimum monthly payments due as of February 1, 2008 annualized, excluding periodic contractual fixed increases and rents calculated based on a percentage of tenants’ sales.


 
15

 

Rental and Occupancy Rates

The following table sets forth information regarding the expiring leases for our wholly owned outlet centers during each of the last five calendar years.

   
Total Expiring
 
Renewed by Existing
Tenants
Year
 
       GLA  
(sq. ft.)
 
% of
Total Center GLA
 
      GLA  
(sq. ft.)
 
% of
Expiring GLA
2007
 
1,572,000
 
19
 
1,246,000
 
79
 
2006
 
1,760,000
 
21
 
1,466,000
 
83
 
2005
 
1,812,000
 
22
 
1,525,000
 
84
 
2004
 
1,790,000
 
20
 
1,571,000
 
88
 
2003
 
1,070,000
 
12
 
854,000
 
80
 

The following tables set forth the weighted average base rental rate increases per square foot on both a cash and straight-line basis for our wholly owned outlet centers upon re-leasing stores that were turned over or renewed during each of the last five calendar years.

 Cash Basis (excludes periodic, contractual fixed rent increases)

 
Renewals of Existing Leases
 
Stores Re-leased to New Tenants (1)
   
 
Average Annualized Base Rents
     
Average Annualized Base Rents
 
   
($ per sq. ft.)
     
($ per sq. ft.)
 
Year
GLA 
(sq. ft.)
Expiring
New
%     
Increase
 
 
GLA
(sq. ft.)
 
Expiring
 
New
%     
Increase
   
2007
1,246,000
$ 16.11
$ 17.85
11
610,000
 
$ 17.07
$ 22.26
     30
   
2006
1,466,000
$ 15.91
$ 17.22
8
465,000
 
$ 16.43
$ 19.16
     17
   
2005
1,525,000
$ 15.44
$ 16.37
6
419,000
 
$ 16.56
$ 17.74
     7
   
2004
1,571,000
$ 13.63
$ 14.40
6
427,000
 
$ 16.43
$ 17.27
     5
   
2003
854,000
$ 13.29
$ 13.32
--
272,000
 
$ 16.47
$ 17.13
    4
   

Straight-line Basis (includes periodic, contractual fixed rent increases) (2)

 
Renewals of Existing Leases
 
Stores Re-leased to New Tenants (1)
   
 
Average Annualized Base Rents
     
Average Annualized Base Rents
 
   
($ per sq. ft.)
     
($ per sq. ft.)
 
Year
GLA 
(sq. ft.)
Expiring
New
%     
Increase
 
 
GLA  
(sq. ft.)
 
Expiring
 
New
%     
 Increase
   
2007
1,246,000
$ 15.94
$ 18.15
14
610,000
 
$ 16.75
$ 23.41
     40
   
2006
1,466,000
$ 15.65
$ 17.43
11
465,000
 
$ 16.19
$ 19.90
     23
   

(1)
The square footage released to new tenants for 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004 and 2003 contains 164,000, 129,000, 112,000, 94,000 and 49,000 square feet, respectively, that was released to new tenants upon expiration of an existing lease during the current year.
(2)
Information not available prior to 2006.


 
16

 

Occupancy Costs

We believe that our ratio of average tenant occupancy cost (which includes base rent, common area maintenance, real estate taxes, insurance, advertising and promotions) to average sales per square foot is low relative to other forms of retail distribution.  The following table sets forth for tenants that report sales, for each of the last five years, tenant occupancy costs per square foot as a percentage of reported tenant sales per square foot for our wholly owned centers.

Year
Occupancy Costs as a
% of Tenant Sales
2007
7.7
2006
7.4
2005
7.5
2004
7.3
2003
7.4


 
17

 

Tenants
The following table sets forth certain information for our wholly owned centers with respect to our ten largest tenants and their store concepts as of February 1, 2008.
Tenant
Number
of Stores
GLA 
(sq. ft.)
% of Total
GLA
The Gap, Inc.:
       
 
Old Navy
20
301,344
3.6
 
 
GAP
23
216,261
2.6
 
 
Banana Republic
15
124,290
1.5
 
 
Gap Kids
5
29,799
0.3
 
   
63
671,694
8.0
 
Phillips-Van Heusen Corporation:
       
 
Bass Shoe
28
180,618
2.1
 
 
Van Heusen
26
110,847
1.3
 
 
Calvin Klein, Inc.
11
56,561
0.7
 
 
Geoffrey Beene Co. Store
13
48,185
0.6
 
 
Izod
15
40,052
0.5
 
 
93
436,263
5.2
 
Liz Claiborne:
       
Liz Claiborne
23
241,525
2.9
 
Liz Claiborne Women
5
15,084
0.2
 
 
Ellen Tracy
3
12,474
0.1
 
 
DKNY Jeans
2
5,820
0.1
 
 
Claiborne Mens
1
3,100
0.1
 
 
Kate Spade
1
2,500
*
 
 
Juicy Couture
1
2,475
*
 
 
Dana Buchman
1
2,000
*
 
 
37
284,978
3.4
 
VF Factory Outlet:
       
 
VF Factory Outlet, Inc.
7
172,541
2.1
 
 
Nautica Factory Stores
19
89,904
1.1
 
 
Nautica Kids
2
5,841
*
 
 
Vans
2
5,000
*
 
 
30
273,286
3.2
 
Nike:
       
 
Nike
19
264,185
3.1
 
 
Cole-Haan
2
6,223
0.1
 
 
21
270,408
3.2
 
Adidas:
       
 
Reebok
21
198,058
2.3
 
 
Adidas
7
55,572
0.7
 
 
Rockport
3
9,046
0.1
 
   
31
262,676
3.1
 
Dress Barn, Inc.:
       
 
Dress Barn
24
190,155
2.3
 
 
Maurice’s
8
31,157
0.4
 
 
Dress Barn Petite
2
9,570
0.1
 
 
Dress Barn Woman
2
7,470
0.1
 
 
36
238,352
2.9
 
Carter’s:
       
 
OshKosh B”Gosh
23
117,988
1.4
 
 
Carter’s
20
94,233
1.1
 
 
43
212,221
2.5
 
Polo Ralph Lauren:
       
 
Polo Ralph Lauren
20
180,728
2.2
 
 
Polo Jeans Outlet
1
5,000
0.1
 
 
Polo Ralph Lauren Children
1
3,000
*
 
 
22
188,728
2.3
 
Jones Retail Corporation:
       
 
Jones Retail Corporation
15
52,377
0.6
 
 
Nine West
20
51,827
0.6
 
 
Easy Spirit
15
41,336
0.5
 
 
Kasper
10
24,934
0.3
 
 
Anne Klein
6
14,655
0.2
 
 
66
185,129
2.2
 
         
Total of all tenants listed in table
442
3,023,735
36.0
 

* Less than 0.1%.

 
18

 


Significant Property

The Rehoboth Beach, Delaware outlet center is the only property that comprises more than 10% of our consolidated gross revenues or consolidated total assets.  The Rehoboth Beach center, acquired in December 2003, represented 11% of our consolidated total assets as of December 31, 2007.  The Rehoboth Beach center is 568,926 square feet.

Tenants at the Rehoboth Beach outlet center principally conduct retail sales operations.  The following table shows occupancy and certain base rental information related to this property as of December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005:

Center Occupancy
2007
2006
2005
Rehoboth Beach, DE
99%
99%
99%
       
Average base rental rates per weighted average GLA
 
2007
 
2006
 
2005
Rehoboth Beach, DE
$ 21.71
$ 22.02
$ 20.04

Depreciation on the Rehoboth Beach outlet center is computed on the straight-line basis over the estimated useful lives of the assets.  We generally use estimated lives ranging from 25 to 33 years for buildings, 15 years for land improvements and seven years for equipment.  Expenditures for ordinary maintenance and repairs are charged to operations as incurred while significant renovations and improvements, including tenant finishing allowances, which improve and/or extend the useful life of the asset are capitalized and depreciated over their estimated useful life.  At December 31, 2007, the net federal tax basis of this center was approximately $114.3 million.  Real estate taxes assessed on this center during 2007 amounted to $225,000.  Real estate taxes for 2008 are estimated to be approximately $230,000.

The following table sets forth, as of February 1, 2008, scheduled lease expirations at the Rehoboth Beach outlet center assuming that none of the tenants exercise renewal options:
Year
No. of
Leases
Expiring (1)
GLA
(sq. ft.) (1)
Annualized
Base Rent
per sq. ft.
 Annualized
Base Rent  (2)
% of Gross
Annualized
Base Rent
Represented
by Expiring
Leases
2008
11
38,000
$  23.03
$   875,000
8
2009
13
50,000
21.12
1,056,000
10
2010
 41
180,000
20.38
3,669,000
33
2011
21
77,000
23.43
1,804,000
16
2012
12
49,000
17.51
858,000
8
2013
12
81,000
17.48
1,416,000
13
2014
4
16,000
24.06
385,000
3
2015
3
15,000
20.67
310,000
3
2016
2
11,000
21.91
241,000
2
2017
1
12,000
20.75
249,000
2
2018 and thereafter
2
9,000
20.78
187,000
2
Total
122
538,000
$  20.54
$ 11,050,000
100
 
(1)  Excludes leases that have been entered into but which tenant has not taken possession, vacant suites, temporary leases and month-to-month leases totaling in the aggregate approximately 31,000 square feet.
 
(2)  Annualized base rent is defined as the minimum monthly payments due as of February 1, 2008, excluding periodic contractual fixed increases and rents calculated based on a percentage of tenants’ sales.

 
19

 


Item 3.
Legal Proceedings

We are subject to legal proceedings and claims that have arisen in the ordinary course of our business and have not been finally adjudicated.  In our opinion, the ultimate resolution of these matters will have no material effect on our results of operations or financial condition.

Item 4.
Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders

There were no matters submitted to a vote of security holders, through solicitation of proxies or otherwise, during the fourth quarter of the fiscal year ended December 31, 2007.


 
20

 

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE REGISTRANT

     The following table sets forth certain information concerning our executive officers:

NAME
AGE
POSITION
Stanley K. Tanger
84
Founder, Chairman of the Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer
Steven B Tanger
59
Director, President and Chief Operating Officer
Frank C. Marchisello, Jr.
49
Executive Vice President – Chief Financial Officer and Secretary
Joseph N. Nehmen
59
Senior Vice President – Operations
Carrie A. Warren
45
Senior Vice President – Marketing
Kevin M. Dillon
49
Senior Vice President – Construction and Development
Lisa J. Morrison
48
Senior Vice President – Leasing
James F. Williams
43
Senior Vice President – Controller
Virginia R. Summerell
49
Vice President – Treasurer and Assistant Secretary

     The following is a biographical summary of the experience of our executive officers:

     Stanley K. Tanger.  Mr. Tanger is the founder, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Company.  He also served as President from inception of the Company to December 1994.  Mr. Tanger opened one of the country’s first outlet shopping centers in Burlington, North Carolina in 1981.  Before entering the factory outlet center business, Mr. Tanger was President and Chief Executive Officer of his family’s apparel manufacturing business, Tanger/Creighton, Inc., for 30 years.

     Steven B. Tanger.  Mr. Tanger is a director of the Company and was named President and Chief Operating Officer effective January 1, 1995.  Previously, Mr. Tanger served as Executive Vice President  since joining the Company in 1986.  He has been with Tanger-related companies for most of his professional career, having served as Executive Vice President of Tanger/Creighton for 10 years. He is responsible for all phases of project development, including site selection, land acquisition and development, leasing, marketing and overall management of existing outlet centers.  Mr. Tanger is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Stanford University School of Business Executive Program. Mr. Tanger is the son of Stanley K. Tanger.

     Frank C. Marchisello, Jr.  Mr. Marchisello was named Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer in April 2003 and was additionally named Secretary in May 2005.  Previously he was named Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer in January 1999 after being named Vice President and Chief Financial Officer in November 1994.  Previously, he served as Chief Accounting Officer since joining the Company in January 1993 and Assistant Treasurer since February 1994. He was employed by Gilliam, Coble & Moser, certified public accountants, from 1981 to 1992, the last six years of which he was a partner of the firm in charge of various real estate clients.  Mr. Marchisello is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and is a certified public accountant.

     Joseph H. Nehmen.  Mr. Nehmen was named Senior Vice President - Operations in January 1999.  He joined the Company in September 1995 and was named Vice President of Operations in October 1995.  Mr. Nehmen has over 20 years experience in private business.  Prior to joining Tanger, Mr. Nehmen was owner of Merchants Wholesaler, a privately held distribution company in St. Louis, Missouri.  He is a graduate of Washington University.  Mr. Nehmen is the son-in-law of Stanley K. Tanger and brother-in-law of Steven B. Tanger.

     Carrie A. Warren.  Ms. Warren was named Senior Vice President - Marketing in May 2000.  Previously, she held the position of Vice President – Marketing since September 1996 and Assistant Vice President - Marketing since joining the Company in December 1995.  Prior to joining Tanger, Ms. Warren was with Prime Retail, L.P. for 4 years where she served as Regional Marketing Director responsible for coordinating and directing marketing for five outlet centers in the southeast region.  Prior to joining Prime Retail, L.P., Ms. Warren was Marketing Manager for North Hills, Inc. for five years and also served in the same role for the Edward J. DeBartolo Corp. for two years.  Ms. Warren is a graduate of East Carolina University.

 
21

 


     Kevin M. Dillon.  Mr. Dillon was named Senior Vice President – Construction and Development in August 2004.  Previously, he held the positions of Vice President – Construction and Development from May 2002 to August 2004, Vice President – Construction from October 1997 to May 2002, Director of Construction from September 1996 to October 1997 and Construction Manager from November 1993, the month he joined the Company, to September 1996.  Prior to joining the Company, Mr. Dillon was employed by New Market Development Company for six years where he served as Senior Project Manager.  Prior to joining New Market, Mr. Dillon was the Development Director of Western Development Company where he spent 6 years.

     Lisa J. Morrison.  Ms. Morrison was named Senior Vice President – Leasing in August 2004.  Previously, she held the positions of Vice President – Leasing from May 2001 to August 2004, Assistant Vice President of Leasing from August 2000 to May 2001 and Director of Leasing from April 1999 until August 2000.  Prior to joining the Company, Ms. Morrison was employed by the Taubman Company and Trizec Properties, Inc. where she served as a leasing agent.  Her major responsibilities include managing the leasing strategies for our operating properties, as well as expansions and new development.  She also oversees the leasing personnel and the merchandising and occupancy for Tanger properties.
 
     James F. Williams.  Mr. Williams was named Senior Vice President and Controller in February 2006.  Mr. Williams joined the Company in September 1993, was promoted to Controller in January 1995 and was named Assistant Vice President in January 1997 and Vice President in April 2004. Prior to joining the Company Mr. Williams was the Financial Reporting Manager of Guilford Mills, Inc. from April 1991 to September 1993 and was employed by Arthur Andersen for 5 years from 1987 to 1991. Mr. Williams graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in December 1986 and is a certified public accountant.
 
     Virginia R. Summerell.  Ms. Summerell was named Vice President, Treasurer and Assistant Secretary of the Company in May 2005.  Since joining the Company in August 1992, she has held various positions including Treasurer, Assistant Secretary and Director of Finance.  Her major responsibilities include developing and maintaining banking relationships, oversight of all project and corporate finance transactions and management of treasury systems.  Previously she served as a Vice President and in other capacities at Bank of America and its predecessors in Real Estate and Corporate Lending for nine years.  Ms. Summerell is a graduate of Davidson College and holds an MBA from the Babcock School at Wake Forest University.

 
22

 

PART II

Item 5.
Market For Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Shareholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Market Information
The common shares commenced trading on the New York Stock Exchange on May 28, 1993.  The following table sets forth the high and low sales prices of the common shares as reported on the New York Stock Exchange Composite Tape, during the periods indicated.

2007
High
Low
Common
Dividends Paid
First Quarter
$ 43.56
$ 37.34
$   .3400
Second Quarter
42.57
36.34
.3600
Third Quarter
41.25
32.32
.3600
Fourth Quarter
44.43
37.04
.3600
Year 2007
$ 44.43
$ 32.32
$ 1.4200
       
2006
High
Low
   Common
Dividends Paid
First Quarter
$ 35.45
$ 28.00
$   .3225
Second Quarter
34.31
30.37
.3400
Third Quarter
36.22
30.61
.3400
Fourth Quarter
40.09
35.23
.3400
Year 2006
$ 40.09
$ 28.00
$ 1.3425


 
Holders
As of February 1, 2008, there were approximately 603 common shareholders of record.

Dividends
We operate in a manner intended to enable us to qualify as a REIT under the Internal Revenue Code, or the Code.  A REIT is required to distribute at least 90% of its taxable income to its shareholders each year.  We intend to continue to qualify as a REIT and to distribute substantially all of our taxable income to our shareholders through the payment of regular quarterly dividends.  Certain of our debt agreements limit the payment of dividends such that dividends shall not exceed funds from operations, or FFO, as defined in the agreements, for the prior fiscal year on an annual basis or 95% of FFO on a cumulative basis.

Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans
The information required by this Item is set forth in Part III Item 12 of this document.

Performance Graph
The following Performance Graph and related information shall not be deemed “soliciting material” or to be “filed” with the Securities and Exchange Commission, nor shall such information be incorporated by reference into any future filing under the Securities Act of 1933 or Securities Act of 1934, each as amended, except to the extent that the Company specifically incorporates it by reference into such filing.

The following share price performance chart compares our performance to the index of equity REITs prepared by the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts ("NAREIT") and the SNL Shopping Center REIT index prepared by SNL Financial. Equity REITs are defined as those that derive more than 75% of their income from equity investments in real estate assets. The NAREIT equity index includes all tax qualified real estate investment trusts listed on the New York Stock Exchange, American Stock Exchange or the NASDAQ National Market System.

All share price performance assumes an initial investment of $100 at the beginning of the period and assumes the reinvestment of dividends. Share price performance, presented for the five years ended December 31, 2007, is not necessarily indicative of future results.

23

Total Return Performance
 
 
 
 
   
Period Ending
 
Index
12/31/02
12/31/03
12/31/04
12/31/05
12/31/06
12/31/07
Tanger Factory Outlet Centers, Inc.
100.00
141.09
194.87
222.73
315.20
315.49
NAREIT All Equity REIT Index
100.00
137.13
180.44
202.38
273.34
230.45
SNL REIT Retail Shopping Ctr Index
100.00
141.78
192.62
210.19
282.93
232.94


Purchases of Equity Securities by the Issuer and Affiliated Purchasers
During 1998, our Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to $6 million of our common shares. The timing and amount of the repurchases is at the discretion of management.  We have not made any repurchases since 1999 and the amount authorized for future repurchases remaining at December 31, 2007 totaled $4.8 million.

 
24

 

Item 6.  Selected Financial Data

             2007         2006           2005            2004        2003  
   
(in thousands, except per share and center data)
 
OPERATING DATA
                             
Total revenues
  $ 228,765     $ 210,962     $ 197,949     $ 189,651     $ 112,748  
Operating income
    71,565       68,942       73,769       68,961       39,602  
Income from continuing operations
    28,478       25,465       6,372       6,329       10,214  
Net income
    28,576       37,309       5,089       7,046       12,849  
SHARE DATA
                                       
Basic:
                                       
Income from continuing operations
  $ .74     $ .65     $ .07     $ .23     $ .47  
Net income available to common
                                       
shareholders
  $ .74     $ 1.04     $ .16     $ .26     $ .60  
Weighted average common shares
    30,821       30,599       28,380       27,044       20,103  
Diluted:
                                       
Income from continuing operations
  $ .72     $ .64     $ .07     $ .23     $ .46  
Net income available to common
                                       
shareholders
  $ .72     $ 1.03     $ .16     $ .26     $ .59  
Weighted average common shares
    31,668       31,081       28,646       27,261       20,566  
Common dividends paid
  $ 1.42     $ 1.34     $ 1.28     $ 1.25     $ 1.23  
BALANCE SHEET DATA
                                       
Real estate assets, before depreciation
  $ 1,287,137     $ 1,216,847     $ 1,152,866     $ 1,077,393     $ 1,078,553  
Total assets
    1,060,280       1,040,877       1,000,605       936,378       987,437  
Debt
    706,345       678,579       663,607       488,007       540,319  
Shareholders’ equity
    249,204       274,676       250,214       161,133       167,418  
                                         
OTHER DATA
                                       
Cash flows provided by (used in):
                                       
Operating activities
  $ 98,588     $ 88,390     $ 83,902     $ 84,816     $ 46,561  
Investing activities
  $ (84,803 )   $ (63,336 )   $ (336,563 )   $ 2,607     $ (327,068 )
Financing activities
  $ (19,826 )   $ (19,531 )   $ 251,488     $ (93,156 )   $ 289,271  
                                         
Gross Leasable Area Open:
                                       
Wholly-owned
    8,398       8,388       8,261       5,066       5,299  
Partially-owned (consolidated)
    ---       ---       ---       3,271       3,273  
Partially-owned (unconsolidated)
    667       667       402       402       324  
Managed
    ---       293       64       105       434  
                                         
Number of outlet centers:
                                       
Wholly-owned
    29       30       31       23       26  
Partially-owned (consolidated)
    ---       ---       ---       9       9  
Partially-owned (unconsolidated)
    2       2       1       1       1  
Managed
    ---       3       1       3       4  
                                         
 
      In December 2003, COROC Holdings, LLC, or COROC, a joint venture in which we initially had a one-third ownership interest and  consolidated for financial reporting purposes under the provisions of FIN 46R, purchased the 3.3 million square foot Charter Oak portfolio of outlet center properties for $491.0 million, including the assumption of $186.4 million of cross-collateralized debt which has a stated, fixed interest rate of 6.59% and matures in July 2008.  We recorded the debt at its fair value of $198.3 million, with an effective interest rate of 4.97%.  We funded the majority of our share of the equity required for the transaction through the issuance of 4.6 million common shares on December 10, 2003, generating approximately $88.0 million in net proceeds.  The results of the Charter Oak portfolio have been included in the consolidated financial statements since December 2003.

In November 2005, we purchased for $286.0 million (including acquisition costs) the remaining two-thirds interest in this joint venture.  The transaction was funded with a combination of common and preferred shares and senior unsecured notes.


 
25

 

Item 7.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Cautionary Statements

Certain statements made below are forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.  We intend such forward-looking statements to be covered by the safe harbor provisions for forward-looking statements contained in the Private Securities Reform Act of 1995 and included this statement for purposes of complying with these safe harbor provisions. Forward-looking statements, which are based on certain assumptions and describe our future plans, strategies and expectations, are generally identifiable by use of the words ‘believe’, ‘expect’, ‘intend’, ‘anticipate’, ‘estimate’, ‘project’, or similar expressions.  You should not rely on forward-looking statements since they involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which are, in some cases, beyond our control and which could materially affect our actual results, performance or achievements.  Factors which may cause actual results to differ materially from current expectations include, but are not limited to, those set forth under Item 1A – Risk Factors.

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements appearing elsewhere in this report.  Historical results and percentage relationships set forth in the consolidated statements of operations, including trends which might appear, are not necessarily indicative of future operations.

General Overview

At December 31, 2007, we had 29 wholly-owned centers in 21 states totaling 8.4 million square feet compared to 30 centers in 21 states totaling 8.4 million square feet as of December 31, 2006.  The changes in the number of centers and GLA are due to the following events:

   
No. of 
 Centers
   
GLA
(000’s)
   
States
 
As of December 31, 2006
    30       8,388       21  
Center expansions:
                       
Barstow, California
    ---       7       ---  
Branson, Missouri
    ---       25       ---  
Gonzales, Louisiana
    ---       39       ---  
Tilton, New Hampshire
    ---       18       ---  
Dispositions:
                       
Boaz, Alabama
    (1 )     (80 )     ---  
Other
    ---       1       ---  
As of December 31, 2007
    29       8,398       21  


 
26

 

Results of Operations

2007 Compared to 2006

Base rentals increased $8.7 million, or 6%, in the 2007 period compared to the 2006 period.  Our base rental income increased $5.5 million due to increases in rental rates on lease renewals and incremental rents from re-tenanting vacant space.  During 2007, we executed 460 leases totaling 1.9 million square feet at an average increase of 18%.  This compares to our execution of 479 leases totaling 1.9 million square feet at an average increase of 10% during 2006.  Base rentals also increased approximately $3.7 million related to a full year of operations for our outlet center in Charleston, South Carolina, which opened in August 2006.  However, decreases were recognized in the net amortization of above or below market leases totaling $317,000.

The values of the above and below market leases are amortized and recorded as either an increase (in the case of below market leases) or a decrease (in the case of above market leases) to rental income over the remaining term of the associated lease.  For the 2007 period, we recorded $1.2 million to rental income for the net amortization of market lease values compared with $1.5 million for the 2006 period.  If a tenant vacates its space prior to the contractual termination of the lease and no rental payments are being made on the lease, any unamortized balance of the related above or below market lease value will be written off and could materially impact our net income positively or negatively.  At December 31, 2007, the net liability representing the amount of unrecognized below market lease values totaled $916,000.

Percentage rentals, which represent revenues based on a percentage of tenants' sales volume above predetermined levels (the "breakpoint"), increased $1.6 million or 22%.  The increase is due partially to the addition of high volume tenants during the last twelve months that have exceeded their breakpoints.  Reported same-space sales per square foot for the twelve months ended December 31, 2007 were $342 per square foot, a 1.2% increase over the prior year ended December 31, 2006.  Same-space sales is defined as the weighted average sales per square foot reported in space open for the full duration of each comparison period.  Our ability to attract high volume tenants to many of our outlet centers continues to improve the average sales per square foot throughout our portfolio.

Expense reimbursements, which represent the contractual recovery from tenants of certain common area maintenance, insurance, property tax, promotional, advertising and management expenses generally fluctuate consistently with the related reimbursable property operating expenses to which they relate.  Expense reimbursements increased $7.6 million, or 13%, in the 2007 period versus the 2006 period.  During 2006, we incurred a $1.5 million charge when we wrote off due diligence costs related to an abandoned potential acquisition.  These costs were included in other property operating expenses.  The acquisition due diligence costs were incurred in connection with structuring, performing due diligence and submitting a proposal to acquire a significant portfolio from a public REIT that was exploring its strategic alternatives.  The bid was requested, but ultimately not accepted, by the public REIT.  Excluding these abandoned acquisition costs, expense reimbursements, expressed as a percentage of property operating expenses, were 88% and 87% respectively, in the 2007 and 2006 periods.  The reimbursement percentage increase is due to decreases during 2007 in miscellaneous non-reimbursable expenses such as state franchise and excise taxes.

Property operating expenses increased by $7.6 million, or 11%, in the 2007 period as compared to the 2006 period, excluding the $1.5 million charge mentioned in the previous paragraph.  Of this increase, $2.2 million relates incrementally to our Charleston, South Carolina outlet center which opened in August 2006.  In addition, our common area maintenance costs increased as a result of higher snow removal costs and higher costs related to operating our mall offices at the outlet centers in our portfolio.  Further, our fiscal 2007 property insurance premiums increased significantly upon renewal and remained at that level for the fiscal 2008 renewal.  Also, several high performing centers experienced significant property tax increases upon revaluation.

General and administrative expenses increased $2.3 million, or 14%, in the 2007 period as compared to the 2006 period.  The increase is primarily due to compensation expense related to restricted shares issued during the 2007 period as well as an increase in bonus compensation for senior executives in the 2007 period. As a percentage of total revenues, general and administrative expenses were 8% in both the 2007 and 2006 periods.


 
27

 

Depreciation and amortization increased from $57.0 million in the 2006 period to $63.8 million in the 2007 period.
A full year of depreciation and amortization related to the assets at our outlet center in Charleston, South Carolina which opened in August 2006 accounted for $2.0 million of the increase.  Also, during the first quarter of 2007, our Board of Directors formally approved a plan to reconfigure our center in Foley, Alabama.  As a part of this plan, approximately 42,000 square feet was relocated within the property by September 2007.  The depreciable useful lives of the buildings demolished were shortened to coincide with their demolition dates throughout the first three quarters of 2007 and the change in estimated useful life was accounted for as a change in accounting estimate. Approximately 28,000 relocated square feet had opened as of December 31, 2007 with the remaining 14,000 square feet expected to open in the next two quarters.  Accelerated depreciation recognized related to the reconfiguration was $6.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2007. These increases were offset by a decrease in lease cost amortization of approximately $2.0 million, primarily related to the amortization of the intangibles from the COROC acquisitions in 2003 and 2005.

Equity in earnings of unconsolidated joint ventures increased $205,000, or 16%, in the 2007 period as compared to the 2006 period.  During August 2006, we opened a 264,900 square foot center in Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin, which is owned by Tanger Wisconsin Dells, in which we have a 50% ownership interest and account for as an unconsolidated joint venture under the equity method.  This center was open for all of 2007 which resulted in the increase in our equity in earnings of unconsolidated joint ventures.

Discontinued operations includes the results of operations and gains on sale of real estate of our Boaz, Alabama;  Pigeon Forge, Tennessee and North Branch, Minnesota centers, which were sold in 2007 and 2006, respectively.  The following table summarizes the results of operations and gains on sale of real estate for the 2007 and 2006 periods:

Summary of discontinued operations
 
2007
   
2006
 
Operating income from discontinued operations
  $ 112     $ 365  
Gain on sale of real estate
    6       13,833  
Income from discontinued operations
    118       14,198  
Minority interest in discontinued operations
    (20 )     (2,354 )
Discontinued operations, net of minority interest
  $ 98     $ 11,844  

2006 Compared to 2005

Base rentals increased $7.5 million, or 6%, in the 2006 period compared to the 2005 period.  Our overall occupancy rates for our stabilized outlet centers were comparable from year to year at 97.5% and 97.0%.  Our base rental income increased $4.5 million due to increases in rental rates on lease renewals and incremental rents from re-tenanting vacant space.  During 2006, we executed 479 leases totaling 1.9 million square feet at an average increase of 10%.  This compares to our execution of 460 leases totaling 1.9 million square feet at an average increase of 6% during 2005.  Base rentals also increased approximately $2.1 million due to the August 2006 opening of our new center in Charleston, South Carolina.  Additionally, increases were recognized in the net amortization of above or below market leases totaling $723,000.

The values of the above and below market leases are amortized and recorded as either an increase (in the case of below market leases) or a decrease (in the case of above market leases) to rental income over the remaining term of the associated lease.  For the 2006 period, we recorded $1.5 million to rental income for the net amortization of market lease values compared with $741,000 for the 2005 period.  If a tenant vacates its space prior to the contractual termination of the lease and no rental payments are being made on the lease, any unamortized balance of the related above or below market lease value will be written off and could materially impact our net income positively or negatively.  At December 31, 2006, the net liability representing the amount of unrecognized below market lease values totaled $2.1 million.


 
28

 

Percentage rentals, which represent revenues based on a percentage of tenants' sales volume above predetermined levels (the "breakpoint"), increased $840,000 or 13%.  Reported same-space sales per square foot for the twelve months ended December 31, 2006 were $338 per square foot, a 4.8% increase over the prior year ended December 31, 2005.  Same-space sales is defined as the weighted average sales per square foot reported in space open for the full duration of each comparison period.  Our ability to attract high volume tenants to many of our outlet centers continues to improve the average sales per square foot throughout our portfolio.

Expense reimbursements, which represent the contractual recovery from tenants of certain common area maintenance, insurance, property tax, promotional, advertising and management expenses generally fluctuate consistently with the related reimbursable property operating expenses to which they relate.  Expense reimbursements increased $3.1 million, or 6%, in the 2006 period versus the 2005 period.  During 2006, we incurred a $1.5 million charge when we wrote off due diligence costs related to an abandoned potential acquisition.  These costs were included in other property operating expenses.  The acquisition due diligence costs were incurred in connection with structuring, performing due diligence and submitting a proposal to acquire a significant portfolio from a public REIT that was exploring its strategic alternatives.  The bid was requested, but ultimately not accepted, by the public REIT.  Excluding these abandoned acquisition costs, expense reimbursements, expressed as a percentage of property operating expenses, were 87% and 89% respectively, in the 2006 and 2005 periods.  The reimbursement percentage decrease is due to increases during 2006 in miscellaneous non-reimbursable expenses such as state franchise and excise taxes.

Other income increased $1.6 million, or 28%, in 2006 compared to 2005 primarily due to the recognition of leasing, marketing and development fee income from our Tanger Wisconsin Dells joint venture, fees from third party management services, gains on sales of outparcels of land and increases in miscellaneous vending income.

Property operating expenses increased by $4.4 million, or 7%, in the 2006 period as compared to the 2005 period, excluding the $1.5 million charge mentioned in the previous paragraph.  Of this increase, $1.8 million relates incrementally to our Charleston, South Carolina outlet center which opened in August 2006.  Excluding these costs associated with the Charleston, South Carolina outlet center and the abandoned acquisition costs, operating expenses increased 4.3 %.  This increase was due to higher property insurance costs upon renewal of our annual policies during the year and non-reimbursable expenses such as state franchise and excise taxes.

General and administrative expenses increased $2.9 million, or 21%, in the 2006 period as compared to the 2005 period.  The increase is primarily due to compensation expense related to restricted shares issued during the 2006 period as well as an increase in bonus compensation for senior executives in the 2006 period. As a percentage of total revenues, general and administrative expenses increased from 7% in the 2005 period to 8% in the 2006 period.

Depreciation and amortization increased from $48.0 million in the 2005 period to $57.0 million in the 2006 period. This was due a full year of depreciation of the assets acquired in December 2005 in the final COROC joint venture acquisition and the accelerated depreciation and amortization of certain assets in the initial acquisition of the COROC properties in December 2003 accounted for under FAS 141 for tenants that terminated their leases during the 2006 period.

As shown in the table below, total interest expense decreased $2.2 million, or 5%, during the 2006 period as compared to the 2005 period.  However, the 2005 period included a large prepayment premium and the write off of deferred loan costs totaling $9.9 million incurred related to the early extinguishment of the $77.4 million John Hancock Life Insurance Company mortgages.  Actual interest expense from borrowings increased during 2006 due to higher overall debt levels related to the $250 million senior unsecured note issuance in November 2005 and the $149.5 million exchangeable senior unsecured note issuance in August 2006.

Summary of interest expense
 
2006
   
2005
 
Interest expense from borrowings, net of capitalization
  $ 38,463     $ 31,816  
Prepayment penalty and deferred loan cost
               
write off related to early extinguishment of debt
    917       9,866  
Loan cost amortization, net of capitalization
    1,395       1,245  
Total interest expense
  $ 40,775     $ 42,927  

29

During August 2006, we opened a 264,900 square foot center in Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin, which is owned by Tanger Wisconsin Dells, in which we have a 50% ownership interest and account for as an unconsolidated joint venture under the equity method.  Our equity in earnings of unconsolidated joint ventures increased from 2005 to 2006 as a result of the opening of this center.

In November 2005, we purchased our consolidated joint venture partner’s interest in COROC.  Therefore, consolidated joint venture minority interest decreased $24.0 million as there was no allocation of earnings to this joint venture partner during 2006.  The allocation of earnings to our joint venture partner was based on a preferred return on investment as opposed to their ownership percentage and accordingly had a significant impact on our earnings during 2005.

Discontinued operations includes the results of operations of our Boaz, Alabama center which was sold in 2007 and the results of operations and gains on sales of real estate for our Pigeon Forge, Tennessee and North Branch, Minnesota centers, both of which were sold in the first quarter of 2006.  The following table summarizes the results of operations and gains on sale of real estate for the 2006 and 2005 periods:

Summary of discontinued operations
 
2006
   
2005
 
Operating income from discontinued operations
  $ 365     $ 3,089  
Gain on sale of real estate
    13,833       ---  
Income from discontinued operations
    14,198       3,089  
Minority interest in discontinued operations
    (2,354 )     (529 )
Discontinued operations, net of minority interest
  $ 11,844     $ 2,560  

During the first quarter of 2005, we sold our outlet center at our Seymour, Indiana property.  Due to significant continuing involvement, the sale did not qualify as discontinued operations under the provisions of FAS 144.  We recorded a loss on sale of real estate of $3.8 million, net of minority interest of $847,000, as a result of the sale. Net proceeds received for the center were approximately $2.0 million.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Net cash provided by operating activities was $98.6 million, $88.4 million and $83.9 million for the years ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005, respectively.  The increase in cash provided by operating activities from 2006 to 2007 is due primarily to higher operating cash flow from the addition of the Charleston, South Carolina center in August 2006 and higher renewal and re-tenant base rental rates throughout our portfolio.  The increase in cash provided from operating activities from 2005 to 2006 is primarily due to the incremental income from the COROC acquisition in November 2005.

Net cash used in investing activities amounted to $84.8 million, $63.3 million and $336.6 million during 2007, 2006 and 2005, respectively, and reflects the acquisitions, expansions and dispositions of real estate during each year.  Both 2007 and 2006 included significant construction activities for new projects with the Charleston, SC outlet center constructed in 2006 and the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania outlet center construction on-going in 2007 and several other outlet center expansions during the year.  Cash used in 2006 was reduced by proceeds from the sale of our Pigeon Forge, Tennessee and North Branch, Minnesota outlet centers during the first quarter of 2006.  In November 2005 we completed the acquisition of the final two-thirds interest of the COROC joint venture.  We originally purchased a one-third interest in December 2003.

Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities amounted to $(19.8) million, $(19.5) million and $251.5 million in 2007, 2006 and 2005, respectively.  These periods reflect increases in cash dividends paid, minority interest distributions and shares outstanding during 2007, 2006 and 2005.  Tax incentive proceeds received related to our Pittsburgh, PA project for the year ended December 31, 2007 of $7.1 million further reduced our 2007 cash outflows from financing activities.  The 2006 period included net proceeds of $19.4 million from the sale of 800,000 preferred shares, a significant portion of which was used to repay amounts outstanding on our unsecured lines of credit.  During 2005 we raised approximately $381.3 million in the public debt and equity markets in order to fund the acquisition described in Item 6, Selected Financial Data, and to repay the John Hancock Life Insurance mortgages.


 
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Current Developments and Dispositions

We intend to continue to grow our portfolio by developing, expanding or acquiring additional outlet centers.  In the section below, we describe the new developments that are either currently planned, underway or recently completed.  However, you should note that any developments or expansions that we, or a joint venture that we are involved in, have planned or anticipated may not be started or completed as scheduled, or may not result in accretive net income or funds from operations.  In addition, we regularly evaluate acquisition or disposition proposals and engage from time to time in negotiations for acquisitions or dispositions of properties.  We may also enter into letters of intent for the purchase or sale of properties.  Any prospective acquisition or disposition that is being evaluated or which is subject to a letter of intent may not be consummated, or if consummated, may not result in an increase in net income or funds from operations.

WHOLLY OWNED CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

During the fourth quarter of 2006, we closed on the acquisition of our development site located south of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in Washington County for $4.8 million.  In response to strong tenant demand for space, we increased the size of the initial phase of the Pittsburgh center from 308,000 square feet to 370,000 square feet, with signed leases for approximately 63% of the first phase and an additional 20% under negotiation or out for signature.  We currently expect delivery of the initial phase in the second quarter of 2008, with stores opening by the end of the third quarter of 2008.  Upon completion of the project, the outlet center will total approximately 418,000 square feet.  The Pittsburgh project is wholly owned by us. Tax incentive financing bonds have been issued related to the Pittsburgh project, and we expect to receive net proceeds of approximately $16.8 million as we incur qualifying expenditures during construction of the center.  As of December 31, 2007 we have received funding for qualified expenditures submitted totaling $7.6 million.

Potential Future Developments

We currently have an option for a new development site located in Mebane, North Carolina on the highly traveled Interstate 40/85 corridor, which sees over 83,000 cars daily.  The site is located halfway between the Research Triangle Park area of Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill, and the Triad area of Greensboro, High Point and Winston-Salem.  The center is currently expected to be approximately 300,000 square feet.  During the option period we will be analyzing the viability of the site and determining whether to proceed with the development of a center at this location.

We have also started the initial pre-development and leasing for a site we have under control in Port St. Lucie, Florida at Exit 118 on Interstate I-95.  Approximately 64,000 cars utilize this exit each day.  Port St. Lucie is one of Florida’s fastest growing cities and is located less than 40 miles north of Palm Beach, Florida and one exit south of the New York Mets’ spring training facility.  This center is expected to be approximately 350,000 square feet and initial reaction to the site from our magnet tenants has been very positive.

At this time, we are in the initial study period on these potential new locations.  As such, there can be no assurance that any of these sites will ultimately be developed.  During the third quarter of 2007 we put on hold our plans to develop a center in Burlington, New Jersey due to numerous development and site access issues.

Expansions at Existing Centers

During 2007, we completed expansions in three of our outlet centers.

 
Expansion
New Total
Center
GLA
Center GLA
Gonzales, Louisiana
39,000
282,000
Branson, Missouri
25,000
303,000
Tilton, New Hampshire
18,000
246,000
Total expansions
82,000
 

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A fourth expansion project, in Barstow, California, is near completion.  Some stores opened during the fourth quarter of 2007 and the remaining stores will open during the first two quarters of 2008.  The total expansion in Barstow of 62,000 square feet will bring the center’s total GLA to 171,300 square feet.

WHOLLY OWNED DISPOSITIONS

In October 2007, we completed the sale of our property in Boaz, Alabama.  Net proceeds received from the sale of the property were approximately $2.0 million.  We recorded a gain on sale of real estate of approximately $6,000.

During the first quarter of 2006, we completed the sale of two outlet centers located in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee and North Branch, Minnesota.  Net proceeds received from the sales of the centers were approximately $20.2 million.  We recorded gains on sales of real estate of $13.8 million associated with these sales during the first quarter of 2006.

CONSOLIDATED JOINT VENTURES

COROC Holdings, LLC

On December 19, 2003, COROC, a joint venture in which we had an initial one-third ownership interest and consolidated for financial reporting purposes under the provisions of FIN 46R, purchased the 3.3 million square foot Charter Oak portfolio of outlet center properties for $491.0 million, including the assumption of $186.4 million of cross-collateralized debt which has a stated, fixed interest rate of 6.59% and matures in July 2028.  We can repay the loan in full without penalty on July 10, 2008, or we can continue to make monthly payments on the loan at a revised interest rate of 8.59%.  We can then repay the loan in full on any monthly payment date without penalty.  We recorded the debt at its fair value of $198.3 million, with an effective interest rate of 4.97%.  Accordingly, a debt premium of $11.9 million was recorded and is being amortized over the life of the debt.  We funded the majority of our share of the equity required for the transaction through the issuance of 4.6 million common shares on December 10, 2003, generating approximately $88.0 million in net proceeds.  The results of the Charter Oak portfolio have been included in the consolidated financial statements from December 2003.

In November 2005, we purchased for $286.0 million (including acquisition costs) the remaining two-thirds interest from our joint venture partner.  We recorded a debt discount of $883,000 with an effective interest rate of 5.25% to reflect the fair value of the debt deemed to have been acquired in the acquisition.  The all cash transaction was funded with a combination of the issuance of common and preferred shares and unsecured senior notes.  The transaction completed the Charter Oak acquisition and solidified our position in the outlet industry.

UNCONSOLIDATED JOINT VENTURES

The following table details certain information as of December 31, 2007 about various unconsolidated real estate joint ventures in which we have an ownership interest:

 
 
Joint Venture
 
 
Center Location
 
Opening
Date
 
Ownership
%
 
Square
Feet
Carrying Value
of Investment
(in millions)
Total Joint
Venture Debt
(in millions)
 
Myrtle Beach Hwy 17
Myrtle Beach, South Carolina
 
2002
 
50%
 
402,013
 
$0.9
 
$35.8
             
 
Wisconsin Dells
Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin
 
2006
 
50%
 
264,929
 
$6.0
 
$25.3
             
 
Deer Park
Deer Park, Long Island NY
Under construction
 
33%
800,000 estimated
 
$3.8
 
$87.3
             
We may issue guarantees on the debt of a joint venture primarily because it allows the joint venture to obtain funding at a lower cost than could be obtained otherwise.  This results in a higher return for the joint venture on its investment and in a higher return on our investment in the joint venture.  We have joint and several guarantees for a portion of the debt outstanding for Wisconsin Dells and Deer Park as of December 31, 2007.

As is typical in real estate joint ventures, each of the above ventures contains provisions where a venture partner can trigger certain provisions and force the other partners to either buy or sell their investment in the joint venture.  Should this occur, we may be required to incur a significant cash outflow in order to maintain ownership of these outlet centers.

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Myrtle Beach Hwy 17

The Myrtle Beach Hwy 17 joint venture, in which we have a 50% ownership interest, has owned a Tanger Outlet Center located on Highway 17 in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina since June 2002.  The Myrtle Beach center now consists of approximately 402,000 square feet and has over 90 name brand tenants.

During March 2005, Myrtle Beach Hwy 17 entered into an interest rate swap agreement with Bank of America with a notional amount of $35 million for five years.  Under this agreement, the joint venture receives a floating interest rate based on the 30 day LIBOR index and pays a fixed interest rate of 4.59%.  This swap effectively changes the rate of interest on $35 million of variable rate mortgage debt to a fixed rate of 5.99% for the contract period.

In April 2005, the joint venture obtained non-recourse, permanent financing to replace the construction loan debt that was utilized to build the outlet center.  The new mortgage amount is $35.8 million with a rate of LIBOR + 1.40%.  The note is for a term of five years with payments of interest only. In April 2010, the joint venture has the option to extend the maturity date of the loan two more years until 2012.  All debt incurred by this unconsolidated joint venture is collateralized by its property.

Wisconsin Dells

In March 2005, we established the Tanger Wisconsin Dells joint venture to construct and own a Tanger Outlet center in Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin.  The 264,900 square foot center opened in August 2006. In February 2006, in conjunction with the construction of the center, the Wisconsin Dells joint venture closed on a construction loan in the amount of $30.3 million with Wells Fargo Bank, NA due in February 2009.  The construction loan is repayable on an interest only basis with interest floating based on the 30, 60 or 90 day LIBOR index plus 1.30%.  The construction loan incurred by this unconsolidated joint venture is collateralized by its property as well as joint and several guarantees by us and designated guarantors of our venture partner.  During the second quarter of 2007, the Wisconsin Dells joint venture received $5.0 million in tax incentive financing proceeds which were used to repay amounts outstanding on the construction loan.  The construction loan balance as of December 31, 2007 was approximately $25.3 million.

Deer Park

In October 2003, we established the Deer Park joint venture to develop and own a Tanger Outlet center in Deer Park, New York.   Construction has begun on the initial phase that will contain approximately 682,000 square feet including a 32,000 square foot Neiman Marcus Last Call store, which will be the first and only one on Long Island. Other tenants will include Anne Klein, Banana Republic, BCBG, Christmas Tree Shops, Disney, Eddie Bauer, Reebok, New York Sports Club and many more.  Regal Cinemas has also leased 71,000 square feet for a 16-screen Cineplex, one of the few state of the art cineplexes on Long Island.  We currently expect to open the first phase of the center by the end of the third quarter of 2008.  Upon completion of the project, the shopping center will contain over 800,000 square feet.


 
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In May 2007, the joint venture closed on a $284 million construction loan for the project arranged by Bank of America with a weighted average interest rate of 30 day LIBOR plus 1.49%.  Over the life of the loan, if certain criteria are met, the weighted average interest rate can decrease to 30 day LIBOR plus 1.23%.  The loan, which had a balance as of December 31, 2007 of $87.3 million, is originally scheduled to mature in May 2010 with a one year extension option at that date. The loan is collateralized by the property as well as joint and several guarantees by all three venture partners.  The joint venture entered into two interest rate swap agreements during June 2007.  The first swap is for a notional amount of $49.0 million and the second is a forward starting interest rate swap agreement with escalating notional amounts that totaled $22.3 million as of December 31, 2007.  The notional amount of the forward starting interest rate swap agreement will total $121.0 million by November 1, 2008.  The agreements expire on June 1, 2009. These swaps will effectively change the rate of interest on up to $170.0 million of variable rate mortgage debt to a fixed rate of 6.75%.  See Note 8, Derivatives, for further discussion relating to these interest rate swap agreements.

Our guarantee of the construction loan debt is accounted for under the provisions of FIN 45.  As construction draws are funded, we record the fair value of our guarantee of the Deer Park joint venture's debt as an increase to our investment in Deer Park and an increase to a corresponding guarantee liability. We have elected to account for the release from the obligation under the guarantee by the straight-line method over the life of the guarantee. The current value of the guarantee liability as of December 31, 2007 was approximately $879,000.

The original purchase of the property was in the form of a sale-leaseback transaction, which consisted of the sale of the property to Deer Park for $29.0 million, including a 900,000 square foot industrial building, which was then leased back to the seller under an operating lease agreement.  Through May 2006, the Deer Park joint venture accounted for the lease revenues under the provisions of FASB Statement No. 67 “Accounting for Costs and Initial Rental Operations of Real Estate Projects”, where the rent received from the tenant prior to May 2005 and that accrued from June 2005 through May 2006, net of applicable expenses, were treated as incidental revenues and were recorded as a reduction in the basis of the assets.
 
At the end of the lease in May 2005, the tenant vacated the building. However, the tenant did not satisfy all of the conditions necessary to terminate the lease until May 2006. Deer Park is currently in litigation to recover from the tenant its monthly lease payments from June 2005 through May 2006, approximately $3.4 millon, and will continue to do so until recovered.  Deer Park discontinued the accrual of rental revenues associated with the sale-leaseback transaction as of May 2006.
Financing Arrangements

In February 2006, we completed the sale of an additional 800,000 Class C Preferred Shares with net proceeds of approximately $19.4 million, bringing the total amount of Class C Preferred Shares outstanding to 3,000,000.  The proceeds were used to repay amounts outstanding on our unsecured lines of credit.  We pay annual dividends equal to $1.875 per share.

In August 2006, the Operating Partnership issued $149.5 million of exchangeable senior unsecured notes that mature on August 15, 2026.  The notes bear interest at a fixed coupon rate of 3.75%.  The notes are exchangeable into the Company’s common shares, at the option of the holder, at a current exchange ratio, subject to adjustment if we change our dividend rate in the future, of 27.6991 shares per $1,000 principal amount of notes (or a current exchange price of $36.1023 per common share).  The notes are senior unsecured obligations of the Operating Partnership and are guaranteed by the Company on a senior unsecured basis.  On and after August 18, 2011, holders may exchange their notes for cash in an amount equal to the lesser of the exchange value and the aggregate principal amount of the notes to be exchanged, and, at our option, Company common shares, cash or a combination thereof for any excess.  Note holders may exchange their notes prior to August 18, 2011 only upon the occurrence of specified events.  In addition, on August 18, 2011, August 15, 2016 or August 15, 2021, note holders may require us to repurchase the notes for an amount equal to the principal amount of the notes plus any accrued and unpaid interest up to, but excluding, the repurchase date.

At December 31, 2007, approximately 75% of our outstanding long-term debt represented unsecured borrowings and approximately 57% of the gross book value of our real estate portfolio was unencumbered.

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We intend to retain the ability to raise additional capital, including public debt or equity, to pursue attractive investment opportunities that may arise and to otherwise act in a manner that we believe to be in our shareholders' best interests.  At the 2007 Annual Shareholders’ Meeting, we increased our authorized common shares from 50.0 million to 150.0 million and added four additional classes of preferred shares with an authorized number of four million shares each.  During the third quarter of 2006, we updated our shelf registration as a well known seasoned issuer where we will be able to register unspecified amounts of different classes of securities on Form S-3.  To generate capital to reinvest into other attractive investment opportunities, we may also consider the use of additional operational and developmental joint ventures, the sale or lease of outparcels on our existing properties and the sale of certain properties that do not meet our long-term investment criteria.

During the fourth quarter of 2007, we extended the maturity dates on five of our six unsecured lines of credit from 2009 to June 2011.  During the first quarter of 2008, we increased the maximum availability under our existing unsecured credit facilities by $125.0 million, bringing our total availability to $325.0 million.  The terms of the increases are identical to those included within the existing unsecured credit facilities with the borrowing rate ranging from LIBOR plus 75 basis points to LIBOR plus 85 basis points.

On February 15, 2008, our $100 million, 9.125% unsecured senior notes matured.  We repaid these notes in the short term with amounts available under our unsecured lines of credit.  On July 10, 2008, our only remaining mortgage loan with a principal balance of $172.7 million and bearing interest at a coupon rate of 6.59% will become payable at our option.  Because the mortgage was assumed as part of an acquisition of a portfolio of outlet centers, the debt was recorded at its fair value and carries an effective interest rate of 5.18%.  On the optional payment date, we can decide to repay the loan in full, or we can continue to make monthly payments on the loan at a revised interest rate of 8.59%.  We can then repay the loan in full on any monthly payment date without penalty.  The final maturity date on the loan is July 10, 2028.  We are currently analyzing our various options with respect to refinancing this mortgage.  Based on cash provided by operations, existing credit facilities, ongoing negotiations with certain financial institutions and our ability to sell debt or equity subject to market conditions, we believe that we have access to the necessary financing to fund the planned capital expenditures during 2008.

We anticipate that adequate cash will be available to fund our operating and administrative expenses, regular debt service obligations, and the payment of dividends in accordance with REIT requirements in both the short and long term.  Although we receive most of our rental payments on a monthly basis, distributions to shareholders are made quarterly and interest payments on the senior, unsecured notes are made semi-annually.  Amounts accumulated for such payments will be used in the interim to reduce any outstanding borrowings under the existing lines of credit or invested in short-term money market or other suitable instruments.


 
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Contractual Obligations and Commercial Commitments

The following table details our contractual obligations over the next five years and thereafter as of December 31, 2007 (in thousands):

Contractual
             
Obligations
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
Thereafter
Total
Debt (1)
$272,678
$ ---
$       ---
$ 33,880
$        ---
$ 399,500
$    706,058
Operating leases
4,200
4,040
3,695
3,521
3,041
79,258
97,755
Preferred share
             
 
dividends (2)
5,625
5,625
80,625
---
---
---
91,875
Interest payments
34,134
22,877
22,877
21,929
20,981
124,613
247,411
 
$ 316,637
$ 32,542
$ 107,197
$59,330
$ 24,022
$ 603,371
$ 1,143,099
(1)  
These amounts represent total future cash payments related to debt obligations outstanding as of December 31, 2007.
(2)  
Preferred share dividends reflect dividends on our Class C Preferred Shares on which we pay an annual dividend of $1.875 per share on 3,000,000 outstanding shares as of December 31, 2007.  The Class C Preferred Shares are redeemable at the option of the Company for $25.00 per share after the respective optional redemption date. The future obligations include future dividends on preferred shares through the optional redemption date and the redemption amount is included on the optional redemption date.
(3)  
These amounts represent future interest payments related to our debt obligations based on the fixed and variable interest rates specified in the associated debt agreements.  Al l of our variable rate agreements are based on the 30 day LIBOR rate.  For purposes of calculating future interest amounts on variable interest rate debt, the 30 day LIBOR rate as of December 31, 2007 was used.

In addition to the contractual payment obligations shown in the table above, we also have a property under development and several in the process of being expanded or renovated.  To complete these projects we expect to spend approximately $139.7 million in 2008 and $91.0 million in 2009.  The timing of these expenditures may vary due to delays in construction or acceleration of the opening date of a particular project.

Also, we currently have a total of $200.0 million of US Treasury rate lock contracts that expire in July 2008.  As of December 31, 2007, the amount of funds we would have to pay to settle these contracts was $8.8 million.  Given the current interest rate environment, this amount could change significantly by July 2008 in either a positive or negative manner.  See Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk for further discussion.

Our debt agreements require the maintenance of certain ratios, including debt service coverage and leverage, and limit the payment of dividends such that dividends and distributions will not exceed funds from operations, as defined in the agreements, for the prior fiscal year on an annual basis or 95% on a cumulative basis.  We have historically been and currently are in compliance with all of our debt covenants.  We expect to remain in compliance with all our existing debt covenants; however, should circumstances arise that would cause us to be in default, the various lenders would have the ability to accelerate the maturity on our outstanding debt.

We operate in a manner intended to enable us to qualify as a REIT under the Internal Revenue Code, or the Code.  A REIT which distributes at least 90% of its taxable income to its shareholders each year and which meets certain other conditions is not taxed on that portion of its taxable income which is distributed to its shareholders.  Based on our 2007 taxable income to shareholders, we were required to distribute approximately $30.3 million to our common shareholders in order to maintain our REIT status as described above.  We distributed approximately $44.4 million to common shareholders which significantly exceeds our required distributions.  If events were to occur that would cause our dividend to be reduced, we believe we still have an adequate margin regarding required dividend payments based on our historic dividend and taxable income levels to maintain our REIT status.


 
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Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We are party to a joint and several guarantee with respect to the construction loan obtained by the Wisconsin Dells joint venture during the first quarter of 2006, which currently has a balance of $25.3 million.  We are also party to a joint and several guarantee with respect to the loan obtained by Deer Park which currently has a balance of $87.3 million. See “Joint Ventures” section above for further discussion of off-balance sheet arrangements and their related guarantees.  Our pro-rata portion of the Myrtle Beach Hwy 17 mortgage secured by the center is $17.9 million.  There is no guarantee provided for the Myrtle Beach Hwy 17 mortgage by us.

Related Party Transactions

As noted above in “Unconsolidated Joint Ventures”, we are 50% owners of the Myrtle Beach Hwy 17 and Wisconsin Dells joint ventures.  These joint ventures pay us management, leasing, marketing and development fees, which we believe approximate current market rates, for services provided to the joint ventures.  During 2007, 2006 and 2005, we recognized the following fees (in thousands):

   
Year Ended
December 31,
   
   
2007
2006
       2005
 
Fee:
         
 
Management
 
$  534
$  410
$   327
 
 
Leasing
 
26
188
6
 
 
Marketing
 
108
86
66
 
 
Development
 
---
304
---
 
Total Fees
 
$  668
$  988
$   399
 

Tanger Family Limited Partnership is a related party which holds a limited partnership interest in and is the minority owner of the Operating Partnership.  Stanley K. Tanger, the Company’s Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, is the sole general partner of TFLP.  The only material related party transaction with TFLP is the payment of quarterly distributions of earnings which aggregated $8.6 million, $8.1 million and $7.8 million for the years ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005, respectively.

Critical Accounting Policies

We believe the following critical accounting policies affect our more significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements.

Principles of Consolidation

The consolidated financial statements include our accounts, our wholly-owned subsidiaries, as well as the Operating Partnership and its subsidiaries.  Intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.  Investments in real estate joint ventures that represent non-controlling ownership interests are accounted for using the equity method of accounting.

In 2003, the FASB issued FIN 46R which clarifies the application of existing accounting pronouncements to certain entities in which equity investors do not have the characteristics of a controlling financial interest or do not have sufficient equity at risk for the entity to finance its activities without additional subordinated financial support from other parties. The provisions of FIN 46R were effective for all variable interests in variable interest entities in 2004 and thereafter.


 
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Acquisition of Real Estate

In accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 141 “Business Combinations”, or FAS 141, we allocate the purchase price of acquisitions based on the fair value of land, building, tenant improvements, debt and deferred lease costs and other intangibles, such as the value of leases with above or below market rents, origination costs associated with the in-place leases, and the value of in-place leases and tenant relationships, if any.  We depreciate the amount allocated to building, deferred lease costs and other intangible assets over their estimated useful lives, which generally range from three to 33.3 years.  The values of the above and below market leases are amortized and recorded as either an increase (in the case of below market leases) or a decrease (in the case of above market leases) to rental income over the remaining term of the associated lease.  The values of below market leases that are considered to have renewal periods with below market rents are amortized over the remaining term of the associated lease plus the renewal periods.  The value associated with in-place leases is amortized over the remaining lease term and tenant relationships is amortized over the expected term, which includes an estimated probability of the lease renewal.  If a tenant vacates its space prior to the contractual termination of the lease and no rental payments are being made on the lease, any unamortized balance of the related deferred lease costs is written off.  The tenant improvements and origination costs are amortized as an expense over the remaining life of the lease (or charged against earnings if the lease is terminated prior to its contractual expiration date).  We assess fair value based on estimated cash flow projections that utilize appropriate discount and capitalization rates and available market information.

If we do not allocate appropriately to the separate components of rental property, deferred lease costs and other intangibles or if we do not estimate correctly the total value of the property or the useful lives of the assets, our computation of depreciation and amortization expense may be significantly understated or overstated.

Cost Capitalization

In accordance with SFAS No. 91 “Accounting for Nonrefundable Fees and Costs Associated with Originating or Acquiring Loans and Initial Direct Costs of Leases—an amendment of FASB Statements No. 13, 60, and 65 and a rescission of FASB Statement No. 17”, we capitalize all incremental, direct fees and costs incurred to originate operating leases, including certain general and overhead costs, as deferred charges.  The amount of general and overhead costs we capitalize is based on our estimate of the amount of costs directly related to executing these leases.  We amortize these costs to expense over the estimated average minimum lease term.

We capitalize all costs incurred for the construction and development of properties, including certain general and overhead costs and interest costs.  The amount of general and overhead costs we capitalize is based on our estimate of the amount of costs directly related to the construction or development of these assets.  Direct costs to acquire assets are capitalized once the acquisition becomes probable.

If we incorrectly estimate the amount of costs to capitalize, we could significantly overstate or understate our financial condition and results of operations.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

Rental property held and used by us is reviewed for impairment in the event that facts and circumstances indicate the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. In such an event, we compare the estimated future undiscounted cash flows associated with the asset to the asset’s carrying amount, and if less, recognize an impairment loss in an amount by which the carrying amount exceeds its fair value.  If we do not recognize impairments at appropriate times and in appropriate amounts, our consolidated balance sheet may overstate the value of our long-lived assets.  We believe that no impairment existed at December 31, 2007.


 
38

 

Revenue Recognition

Base rentals are recognized on a straight-line basis over the term of the lease.  Substantially all leases contain provisions which provide additional rents based on each tenants’ sales volume (“percentage rentals”) and reimbursement of the tenants’ share of advertising and promotion, common area maintenance, insurance and real estate tax expenses. Percentage rentals are recognized when specified targets that trigger the contingent rent are met.  Expense reimbursements are recognized in the period the applicable expenses are incurred.  Payments received from the early termination of leases are recognized as revenue from the time payment is receivable until the tenant vacates the space.

New Accounting Pronouncements

In September 2006, the FASB issued Statement of Accounting Standards No. 157, “Fair Value Measurements,” or FAS 157.  FAS 157 defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, and expands disclosures about fair value measurements.  The provisions of this standard apply to other accounting pronouncements that require or permit fair value measurements.  The FASB has deferred the effective date by one year the provisions of FAS 157 for non-financial assets and non-financial liabilities that are recognized or disclosed at fair value in the financial statements on a nonrecurring basis.  We believe that the adoption of this standard on January 1, 2008 will not have a material effect on our consolidated financial statements; however we believe it will likely be required to provide additional disclosures as a part of future financial statements, beginning with the Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2008.

In February 2007, the FASB, issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 159, “The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities” or FAS 159.  FAS 159 permits entities to choose to measure many financial instruments and certain other items at fair value that are not currently required to be measured at fair value.  FAS 159 also establishes presentation and disclosure requirements designed to facilitate comparisons between entities that choose different measurement attributes for similar type of assets and liabilities.  We do not believe the adoption of FAS 159 on January 1, 2008 will have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

In December 2007, the FASB issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 141 (revised 2007) “Business Combinations”, or FAS 141R.  FAS 141R is effective for fiscal years beginning on or after December 15, 2008, which means that we will adopt FAS 141R on January 1, 2009.  FAS 141R replaces FAS 141 “Business Combinations” and requires that the acquisition method of accounting (which FAS 141 called the purchase method) be used for all business combinations, as well as for an acquirer to be identified for each business combination.  FAS 141R establishes principles and requirements for how the acquirer: (i) recognizes and measures in its financial statements the identifiable assets acquired, the liabilities assumed, and any non-controlling interest in the acquiree; (ii) recognizes and measures the goodwill acquired in the business combination or a gain from a bargain purchase; and (iii) determines what information to disclose to enable users of financial statements to evaluate the nature and financial affects of the business combination.  We are currently evaluating the impact of adoption of FAS 141R on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

In December 2007, the FASB issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 160 “Non-controlling Interests in Consolidated Financial Statements, an amendment of ARB No. 51”, or FAS 160.  FAS 160 is effective for fiscal years beginning on or after December 15, 2008, which means that we will adopt FAS 160 on January 1, 2009.  This statement amends ARB 51 to establish accounting and reporting standards for the non-controlling interest in a subsidiary and for the deconsolidation of a subsidiary.  FAS 160 changes accounting and reporting for minority interests, which will be recharacterized as non-controlling interests and classified as a component of equity in the consolidated financial statements.  FAS 160 requires retroactive adoption of the presentation and disclosure requirements for existing minority interests.  All other requirements of SFAS 160 shall be applied prospectively.  We are currently evaluating the impact of adoption of FAS 160 on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows.



 
39

 



Funds from Operations

Funds from Operations, or FFO, represents income before extraordinary items and gains (losses) on sale or disposal of depreciable operating properties, plus depreciation and amortization uniquely significant to real estate and after adjustments for unconsolidated partnerships and joint ventures.

FFO is intended to exclude historical cost depreciation of real estate as required by Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, or GAAP, which assumes that the value of real estate assets diminishes ratably over time.  Historically, however, real estate values have risen or fallen with market conditions.  Because FFO excludes depreciation and amortization unique to real estate, gains and losses from property dispositions and extraordinary items, it provides a performance measure that, when compared year over year, reflects the impact to operations from trends in occupancy rates, rental rates, operating costs, development activities and interest costs, providing perspective not immediately apparent from net income.

We present FFO because we consider it an important supplemental measure of our operating performance and believe it is frequently used by securities analysts, investors and other interested parties in the evaluation of REITs, many of which present FFO when reporting their results.  FFO is widely used by us and others in our industry to evaluate and price potential acquisition candidates.  The National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts, Inc., of which we are a member, has encouraged its member companies to report their FFO as a supplemental, industry-wide standard measure of REIT operating performance.  In addition, a percentage of bonus compensation to certain members of management is based on our FFO performance.

FFO has significant limitations as an analytical tool, and you should not consider it in isolation, or as a substitute for analysis of our results as reported under GAAP.  Some of these limitations are:

§  
FFO does not reflect our cash expenditures, or future requirements, for capital expenditures or contractual commitments;
§  
FFO does not reflect changes in, or cash requirements for, our working capital needs;
§  
Although depreciation and amortization are non-cash charges, the assets being depreciated and amortized will often have to be replaced in the future, and FFO does not reflect any cash requirements for such replacements;
§  
FFO does not reflect the impact of earnings or charges resulting from matters which may not be indicative of our ongoing operations; and
§  
Other companies in our industry may calculate FFO differently than we do, limiting its usefulness as a comparative measure.


 
40

 

Because of these limitations, FFO should not be considered as a measure of discretionary cash available to us to invest in the growth of our business or our dividend paying capacity.  We compensate for these limitations by relying primarily on our GAAP results and using FFO only supplementally.

Below is a reconciliation of net income to FFO for the years ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005 as well as other data for those respective periods (in thousands):
   
2007
   
2006
   
2005
 
Funds from Operations:
                 
Net income
  $ 28,576     $ 37,309     $ 5,089  
Adjusted for:
                       
Minority interest in operating partnership
    4,494       3,970       1,306  
Minority interest adjustment – consolidated joint
                       
venture
    ---       ---       (315 )
Minority interest, depreciation and amortization
                       
attributable to discontinued operations
    165       2,661       1,440  
Depreciation and amortization uniquely significant
                       
to real estate – consolidated
    63,506       56,747       47,728  
Depreciation and amortization uniquely significant
                       
to real estate – unconsolidated joint ventures
    2,611       1,825       1,493  
(Gain) loss on sale of real estate
    (6 )     (13,833 )     3,843  
Funds from operations (1)
    99,346       88,679       60,584  
Preferred share dividends
    (5,625 )     (5,433 )     (538 )
Funds from operations available to common shareholders
                       
and minority unitholders
  $ 93,721     $ 83,246     $ 60,046  
Weighted average shares outstanding (2)
    37,735       37,148       34,713  
                         
(1) The years ended December 31, 2006 and 2005  include gains on sales of outparcels of land of $402 and $1,554, respectively.
(2) Includes the dilutive effect of options, restricted share awards and exchangeable notes and assumes the partnership units of the Operating Partnership held by the minority interest are converted to common shares of the Company.

Economic Conditions and Outlook

The majority of our leases contain provisions designed to mitigate the impact of inflation. Such provisions include clauses for the escalation of base rent and clauses enabling us to receive percentage rentals based on tenants’ gross sales (above predetermined levels, which we believe often are lower than traditional retail industry standards) which generally increase as prices rise.   Most of the leases require the tenant to pay their share of property operating expenses, including common area maintenance, real estate taxes, insurance and advertising and promotion, thereby reducing exposure to increases in costs and operating expenses resulting from inflation.

While factory outlet stores continue to be a profitable and fundamental distribution channel for brand name manufacturers, some retail formats are more successful than others.  As typical in the retail industry, certain tenants have closed, or will close, certain stores by terminating their lease prior to its natural expiration or as a result of filing for protection under bankruptcy laws.

During 2008, we have approximately 1,340,000 square feet, or 16%, of our wholly-owned portfolio coming up for renewal.  If we were unable to successfully renew or release a significant amount of this space on favorable economic terms, the loss in rent could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

We renewed 79% of the 1,572,000 square feet that came up for renewal in 2007 with the existing tenants at a 14% increase in the average base rental rate compared to the expiring rate.  We also re-tenanted 610,000 square feet during 2007 at a 40% increase in the average base rental rate.


 
41

 

Existing tenants’ sales have remained stable and renewals by existing tenants have remained strong.  The existing tenants have already renewed approximately 697,000, or 52%, of the square feet scheduled to expire in 2008 as of February 1, 2008. In addition, we continue to attract and retain additional tenants.  Our factory outlet centers typically include well-known, national, brand name companies.  By maintaining a broad base of creditworthy tenants and a geographically diverse portfolio of properties located across the United States, we reduce our operating and leasing risks. No one tenant (including affiliates) accounts for more than 8% of our combined base and percentage rental revenues.  Accordingly, we do not expect any material adverse impact on our results of operations and financial condition as a result of leases to be renewed or stores to be released.

As of both December 31, 2007 and 2006, occupancy at our wholly owned centers was 98%.  Consistent with our long-term strategy of re-merchandising centers, we will continue to hold space off the market until an appropriate tenant is identified.  While we believe this strategy will add value to our centers in the long-term, it may reduce our average occupancy rates in the near term.

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

Market Risk

We are exposed to various market risks, including changes in interest rates.  Market risk is the potential loss arising from adverse changes in market rates and prices, such as interest rates.  We may periodically enter into certain interest rate protection and interest rate swap agreements to effectively convert floating rate debt to a fixed rate basis and to hedge anticipated future financings.  We do not enter into derivatives or other financial instruments for trading or speculative purposes.

Tanger Properties Limited Partnership

In September 2005, we entered into two forward starting interest rate lock protection agreements to hedge risks related to anticipated future financings in 2005 and 2008.  The 2005 agreement locked the US Treasury index rate at 4.279% on a notional amount of $125 million for 10 years from such date in December 2005.  This lock was unwound in the fourth quarter of 2005 in conjunction with the issuance of the $250 million senior unsecured notes due in 2015 and, as a result, we received a cash payment of $3.2 million.  The gain was recorded in other comprehensive income and is being amortized into earnings using the effective interest method over a 10 year period that coincides with the interest payments associated with the senior unsecured notes due in 2015. The 2008 agreement locked the US Treasury index rate at 4.526% on a notional amount of $100 million for 10 years from such date in July 2008.  In November 2005, we entered into an additional agreement which locked the US Treasury index rate at 4.715% on a notional amount of $100 million for 10 years from such date in July 2008.  We anticipate unsecured debt transactions of at least the notional amount to occur in the designated periods.

The fair value of the interest rate protection agreements represents the estimated receipts or payments that would be made to terminate the agreement.  At December 31, 2007, we would have paid approximately $8.8 million if we terminated the agreements.  If the US Treasury rate index decreased 1% and we were to terminate the agreements, we would have to pay $24.4 million to do so.  The fair value is based on dealer quotes, considering current interest rates and remaining term to maturity.  We currently do not intend to terminate the agreements prior to their maturity because we plan on entering into the debt transactions as indicated.  However, this policy may vary based on market conditions at the time of the forecast transactions.

Myrtle Beach Hwy 17

During March 2005, the Myrtle Beach Hwy 17 joint venture entered into an interest rate swap agreement with a notional amount of $35 million for five years to hedge floating rate debt on the permanent financing that was obtained in April 2005.  Under this agreement, the joint venture receives a floating interest rate based on the 30 day LIBOR index and pays a fixed interest rate of 4.59%.  This swap effectively changes the rate of interest on $35 million of variable rate mortgage debt to a fixed rate debt of 5.99% for the contract period.
  

 
42

 

The fair value of the interest rate swap agreement represents the estimated receipts or payments that would be made to terminate the agreement.  At December 31, 2007, the joint venture would have paid approximately $644,000 if the agreement was terminated.  If the 30 day LIBOR index decreased 1% and the joint venture were to terminate the agreement, it would have to pay $1.4 million to do so.  The fair value is based on dealer quotes, considering current interest rates and remaining term to maturity.  The joint venture does not intend to terminate the interest rate swap agreement prior to its maturity. The fair value of this derivative is currently recorded as a liability on the joint venture’s balance sheet; however, if held to maturity, the value of the swap will be zero at that time.

Deer Park

During June 2007, the Deer Park joint venture entered into two interest rate swap agreements to hedge the cash flows from the floating rate construction loan obtained in May 2007 to construct the outlet center in Deer Park, New York.  The first interest rate swap had a notional amount of $49.0 million.  The second interest rate swap agreement is a forward starting agreement with escalating notional amounts that totaled $22.3 million as of December 31, 2007.  The notional amount of the forward starting interest rate swap agreement will total $121.0 million by November 1, 2008.  Both agreements expire June 1, 2009.  These swaps will effectively change the rate of interest on $170.0 million of variable rate construction debt to a fixed rate of 6.75%.

The fair value of the interest rate swap agreements represents the estimated receipts or payments that would be made to terminate the agreements.  At December 31, 2007, the Deer Park joint venture would have had to pay approximately $3.4 million if the agreements were terminated.  If the LIBOR index decreased 1% and the Deer Park joint venture were to terminate the agreements, it would have to pay $5.2 million to do so.  The fair value is based on dealer quotes, considering current interest rates and remaining term to maturity.  The joint venture does not intend to terminate the interest rate swap agreements prior to their maturity.  The fair value of these derivatives is currently recorded as a liability on the joint venture’s balance sheet; however, if held to maturity, the value of the swaps will be zero at that time.

The following table summarizes the notional values and fair values of our derivative financial instruments as of December 31, 2007.

 
Financial Instrument Type
Notional
Amount
 
Rate
 
Maturity
 
Fair Value
 
TANGER PROPERTIES LIMITED PARTNERSHIP
     
US Treasury Lock
$100,000,000
4.526%
July 2008
$(3,659,000
)
US Treasury Lock
$100,000,000
4.715%
July 2008
$(5,095,000
)
           
DEER PARK
         
LIBOR Interest Rate Swap (1)
$49,000,000
5.47%
June 2009
$(1,217,000
)
LIBOR Interest Rate Swap (2)
$22,300,000
5.34%
June 2009
$(2,136,000
)
           
MYRTLE BEACH HWY 17
         
LIBOR Interest Rate Swap (3)
$  35,000,000
4.59%
March 2010
$   (644,000
)
(1)  
Amount represents the fair value recorded at the Deer Park joint venture, in which we have a 33.3% ownership interest.
(2)  
Derivative is a forward starting interest rate swap agreement with escalating notional amounts totaling $22.3 million as of December 31, 2007.  Outstanding amounts under the agreement will total $121.0 million by November 1, 2008.  Amount represents the fair value recorded at the Deer Park joint venture, in which we have a 33.3% ownership interest.
(3)  
Amount represents the fair value recorded at the Myrtle Beach Hwy 17 joint venture, in which we have a 50% ownership interest.


 
43

 

The fair market value of long-term fixed interest rate debt is subject to market risk.  Generally, the fair market value of fixed interest rate debt will increase as interest rates fall and decrease as interest rates rise.  The estimated fair value of our total long-term debt at December 31, 2007 and 2006 was $723.3 million and $723.5 million, respectively, and its recorded value was $706.3 million and $678.6 million, respectively. A 1% increase from prevailing interest rates at December 31, 2007 and 2006 would result in a decrease in fair value of total long-term debt by approximately $38.2 million and $46.0 million, respectively.  Fair values were determined from quoted market prices, where available, using current interest rates considering credit ratings and the remaining terms to maturity.

Item 8.              Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

The information required by this Item is set forth on the pages indicated in Item 15(a) below.

Item 9.
Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

Not applicable.

Item 9A.           Controls and Procedures

(a)
Evaluation of disclosure control procedures.

 
The Chief Executive Officer, Stanley K. Tanger, and Chief Financial Officer, Frank C. Marchisello Jr., evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures on December 31, 2007 and concluded that, as of that date, the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective to ensure that the information the registrant is required to disclose in its filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission under the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934 is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the Commission’s rules and forms, and to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the registrant in the reports that it files under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to the registrant’s management, including its principal executive officer and principal financial officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

(b)  
Management’s report on internal control over financial reporting.

Internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act, is a process designed by, or under the supervision of, the Company’s chief executive officer and chief financial officer, or persons performing similar functions, and effected by the Company’s board of directors, management and other personnel, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.  The Company’s management, with the participation of the Company’s chief executive officer and chief financial officer, has established and maintained policies and procedures designed to maintain the adequacy of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting, and includes those policies and procedures that:

 
(1)
Pertain to the maintenance of records that in reasonable detail accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the Company;
 
 
(2)
Provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the Company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the Company; and

 
(3)
Provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the Company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.


 
44

 

The Company’s management has evaluated the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2007 based on the criteria established in a report entitled Internal Control—Integrated Framework, issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO).  Based on our assessment and those criteria, the Company’s management has concluded that the Company’s internal control over financial reporting was effective as of December 31, 2007.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree or compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. 

The effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2007 has been audited by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, as stated in their report which appears herein.
 
(c)
There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting identified in connection with the evaluation required by paragraph (d) of Exchange Act Rules 13a-15 or 15d-15 that occurred during our last fiscal quarter ended December 31, 2007 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.
 
Item 9B.          Other Information

All information required to be disclosed in a report on form 8-K during the fourth quarter of 2007 was reported.

45

 
PART III

Certain information required by Part III is omitted from this Report in that the registrant will file a definitive proxy statement pursuant to Regulation 14A, or the Proxy Statement, not later than 120 days after the end of the fiscal year  covered by this Report, and certain information included therein is incorporated herein by reference.  Only those sections of the Proxy Statement which specifically address the items set forth herein are incorporated by reference.

Item 10.
Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

The information concerning our directors required by this Item is incorporated herein by reference to our Proxy Statement to be filed with respect to our Annual Meeting of Shareholders which is expected to be held on May 16, 2008.

The information concerning our executive officers required by this Item is incorporated herein by reference to the section in Part I, Item 4, entitled “Executive Officers of the Registrant”.

The information regarding compliance with Section 16 of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934 is incorporated herein by reference to our Proxy Statement to be filed with respect to our Annual Meeting of Shareholders which is expected to be held on May 16, 2008.

The information concerning our Company Code of Ethics required by this Item is incorporated herein by reference to our Proxy Statement to be filed with respect to our Annual Meeting of Shareholders which is expected to be held on May 16, 2008.

Item 11.          Executive Compensation

The information required by this Item is incorporated herein by reference to our Proxy Statement to be filed with respect to our Annual Meeting of Shareholders which is expected to be held on May 16, 2008.

Item 12.
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Shareholder Matters.

The information required by this Item is incorporated by reference herein to our Proxy Statement to be filed with respect to our Annual Meeting of Shareholders which is expected to be held on May 16, 2008.

The following table provides information as of December 31, 2007 with respect to compensation plans under which the Company’s equity securities are authorized for issuance:
      
 
 
 
 
 
 
Plan Category
 
 
 
(a)
Number of Securities to be
Issued Upon Exercise of
Outstanding Options,
Warrants and Rights
 
 
 
(b)
Weighted Average
Exercise Price of
Outstanding Options,
 Warrants and Rights
(c)
Number of
Securities Remaining
Available for Future
Issuance Under Equity
Compensation Plans
(Excluding Securities
Reflected in Column (a))
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders
368,155
$18.35
1,730,610
Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders
 
---
 
---
 
---
Total
368,155
$18.35
1,730,610


 
46

 

Item 13.
Certain Relationships, Related Transactions and Director Independence

The information required by this Item is incorporated herein by reference to our Proxy Statement to be filed with respect to our Annual Meeting of Shareholders which is expected to be held on May 16, 2008.

Item 14.       Principal Accounting Fees and Services

The information required by Item 9(e) of Schedule 14A is incorporated herein by reference to our Proxy Statement to be filed with respect to our Annual Meeting of Shareholders which is expected to be held on May 16, 2008.

PART IV

Item 15.     Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

(a)           Documents filed as a part of this report:

 
1.
Financial Statements
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
F-1
Consolidated Balance Sheets-December 31, 2007 and 2006
F-2
Consolidated Statements of Operations-
 
Years Ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
F-3
Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity-
 
Years Ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
F-4
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows-
 
Years Ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
F-5
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
F-6 to F-28

2.        Financial Statement Schedule
Schedule III Real Estate and Accumulated Depreciation
F-29 to F-30

All other schedules have been omitted because of the absence of conditions under which they are required or because the required information is given in the above-listed financial statements or notes thereto.

 
47

 

3.         Exhibits

Exhibit No.                                                      Description

2.1
Purchase and Sale Agreement between COROC Holdings, LLC and various entities dated October 3, 2003. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated December 8, 2003.)
   
2.2
Purchase and Sale Agreement for interests in COROC Holdings, LLC between BROC Portfolio, L.L.C. and Tanger COROC, LLC dated August 22, 2005 (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2005.)
   
3.1
Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation of the Company. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 1996.)
   
3.1A
Amendment to Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation dated May 29, 1996. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 1996.)
   
3.1B
Amendment to Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation dated August 20, 1998. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 1998.)
   
3.1C
Amendment to Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation dated September 30, 1999. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 1999.)
   
3.1D
Amendment to Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation dated November 10, 2005. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated November 11, 2005.)
   
3.1E
Amendment to Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation dated June 13, 2007 (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits of the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2007.)
   
3.2
Restated By-Laws of the Company. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated October 30, 2007.)
   
3.3
Amended and Restated Agreement of Limited Partnership for Tanger Properties Limited Partnership dated November 11, 2005. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated November 21, 2005.)
   
4.1
Rights Agreement, dated as of August 20, 1998, between Tanger Factory Outlet Centers, Inc. and BankBoston, N.A., which includes the form of Articles of Amendment to the Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation, designating the preferences, limitations and relative rights of the Class B Preferred Stock as Exhibit A, the form of Right Certificate as Exhibit B and the Summary of Rights as Exhibit C. (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 1.1 to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form 8-A, filed August 24, 1998.)
   
4.1A
Amendment to Rights Agreement, dated as of October 30, 2001. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2001.)

 
48

 


   
4.2
Form of Senior Indenture. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated March 6, 1996.)
   
4.2A
Form of First Supplemental Indenture (to Senior Indenture). (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated March 6, 1996.)
   
4.2B
Form of Second Supplemental Indenture (to Senior Indenture) dated October 24, 1997 among Tanger Properties Limited Partnership, Tanger Factory Outlet Centers, Inc. and State Street Bank & Trust Company. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated October 24, 1997.)
   
4.2C
Form of Third Supplemental Indenture (to Senior Indenture) dated February 15, 2001. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated February 16, 2001.)
   
4.2D
Form of Fourth Supplemental Indenture (to Senior Indenture) dated November 5, 2005. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2006.)
   
4.2E
Form of Fifth Supplemental Indenture (to Senior Indenture) dated August 16, 2006. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2006.)
   
10.1
Amended and Restated Incentive Award Plan of Tanger Factory Outlet Centers, Inc. and Tanger Properties Limited Partnership, effective May 14, 2004. (Incorporated by reference to the Appendix A of the Company’s definitive proxy statement filed on Schedule 14A dated April 12, 2004.)
   
10.3
Form of Stock Option Agreement between the Company and certain Directors. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 1993.)
   
10.4
Form of Unit Option Agreement between the Operating Partnership and certain employees. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 1993.)
   
10.5
Amended and Restated Employment Agreement for Stanley K. Tanger, as of January 1, 2004. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2004.)
   
10.6
Amended and Restated Employment Agreement for Steven B. Tanger, as of January 1, 2004. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2004.)
   
10.7
Amended and Restated Employment Agreement for Frank C. Marchisello, Jr., as of January 1, 2004. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2004.)
   
10.8
Amended and Restated Employment Agreement for Lisa J. Morrison, dated May 9, 2006. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2006.)

 
49

 


   
10.9
Amended and Restated Employment Agreement for Joe Nehmen, as of January 1, 2003.  (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2003.)                         
                                          
10.11
Registration Rights Agreement among the Company, the Tanger Family Limited Partnership and Stanley K. Tanger. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-11 filed May 27, 1993, as amended.)
   
10.11A
Amendment to Registration Rights Agreement among the Company, the Tanger Family Limited Partnership and Stanley K. Tanger. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 1995.)
   
10.11B
Second Amendment to Registration Rights Agreement among the Company, the Tanger Family Limited Partnership and Stanley K. Tanger dated September 4, 2002. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2003.)
   
10.11C
Third Amendment to Registration Rights Agreement among the Company, the Tanger Family Limited Partnership and Stanley K. Tanger dated December 5, 2003. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2003.)
   
10.11D
Fourth Amendment to Registration Rights Agreement among the Company, the Tanger Family Limited Partnership and Stanley K. Tanger dated August 8, 2006. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-3, dated August 9, 2006.)
   
10.12
Agreement Pursuant to Item 601(b)(4)(iii)(A) of Regulation S-K. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-11 filed May 27, 1993, as amended.)
   
10.13
Assignment and Assumption Agreement among Stanley K. Tanger, Stanley K. Tanger & Company, the Tanger Family Limited Partnership, the Operating Partnership and the Company. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-11 filed May 27, 1993, as amended.)
   
10.14
Promissory Notes by and between the Operating Partnership and John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company aggregating $66,500,000. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 1999.)
   
10.15
COROC Holdings, LLC Limited Liability Company Agreement dated October 3, 2003. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated December 8, 2003.)
   
10.16
Form of Shopping Center Management Agreement between owners of COROC Holdings, LLC and Tanger Properties Limited Partnership. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated December 8, 2003.)
   
10.17
Form of Restricted Share Agreement between the Company and certain Officers. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2005.)
   
10.18
Form of Restricted Share Agreement between the Company and certain Officers with certain performance criteria vesting. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2005.)
   
10.19
Form of Restricted Share Agreement between the Company and certain Directors. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2005.)
   
10.20
Purchase Agreement between Tanger Factory Outlet Centers, Inc. and Cohen & Steers Capital Management, Inc. relating to a registered direct offering of 3,000,000 of the Company’s common shares dated August 30, 2005. (Incorporated by reference to the exhibits to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated August 30, 2005.)
   
21.1
List of Subsidiaries.
 
 
23.1
Consent of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP.
   
31.1
Principal Executive Officer Certification Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as Adopted Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes - Oxley Act of 2002.
   
31.2
Principal Financial Officer Certification Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as Adopted Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes - Oxley Act of 2002.
   
32.1
Principal Executive Officer Certification Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as Adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes - Oxley Act of 2002.
   
32.2
Principal Financial Officer Certification Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as Adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes - Oxley Act of 2002.


 
50

 


SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

TANGER FACTORY OUTLET CENTERS, INC.

By:  /s/ Stanley K. Tanger                                  
     Stanley K. Tanger
     Chairman of the Board and
     Chief Executive Officer

February 28, 2008

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the Registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated:


Signature
Title
Date
     
/s/ Stanley K. Tanger
Stanley K. Tanger
Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer
(Principal Executive Officer)
 
February 28, 2008
     
/s/ Steven B. Tanger
Steven B. Tanger
Director, President and
Chief Operating Officer
 
February 28, 2008
     
 
/s/ Frank C. Marchisello Jr.
Frank C. Marchisello Jr.